Back

Theme 1 Abstracts

Presenter / Title / Theme / Institution Abstract
John W. Gudenas
Theme 1
Aurora University; USA
'A Task Based Management Approach for Technology Instruction in a Rapid Degree Completion Program'
A pedagogical system using task based management techniques to integrate information technology outcomes and newly developed e-commerce concepts is presented. This system was designed and implemented for an Information Systems and Research course in a rapid degree completion program. Aurora University developed this program in cooperation with Caterpillar Corporation at the highly automated Montgomery Illinois Plant which is located near Aurora. Rather than bringing a student to Aurora University, an extension of the University was brought to the Caterpillar plant. Select employees, needing degree completion, enter the program in cohorts. This process establishes classrooms on site using existing management/engineer training rooms and their technology. The learning system presented, creates an integrated environment that makes research and team management functionally dependent upon information technology skills. A standard Management Information System text is used for a knowledge basis and extended by the instructor by subdividing the class cohorts into task groups. Each task group has a specific current mission critical technology charge focused upon internet and intranet issues that have an association to their employment enterprise. Each group is required to prepare a written report, an oral presentation with multimedia and peer evaluation. Outcome assessment, independent rubric measurement and student perception indicate a successful system that can be adopted for other environments.
Philippos Pouyioutas
Theme 1
Intercollege; Cyprus
'Employing Open Learning Techniques in Teaching Information Technology'
Considering the positive feedback we got from our college students regarding the use of a supported student-centric model in teaching a course on the World Wide Web (WWW), using the WWW, we decided to extend the utilization of this open learning and teaching environment to other courses. The combination of the learner-centric and teacher-centric model in an open learning environment was to be tested now with teaching a theoretical introductory information technology course. In this paper we describe how a theoretical course, previously taught in the classroom without any use of modern information technology, other than a simple overhead projector, can be redesigned to be delivered in a complete multimedia Web-based approach. Our aim at all times is to approach different student groups and by providing them with more flexible ways of learning to trigger their interest and attention towards their studies and enable them to learn by ways appropriate to their learning styles.
Barbara J. Levine
Theme 1
Robert Morris College; USA
'Integrating Technology in the Undergraduate Curriculum: Preparing Students to Communicate Effectively in Business and Professional Contexts'
The well documented need for individuals with effective communication skills has prompted educators to find ways to help students develop the skills necessary to prepare and present information in business and professional contexts. Good communication requires more than writing and speaking skills. Increasingly, students must also know when and how to use information-related technologies separately and in combination with other media. And educators must be able to use and model the use of these technologies in the professions. This paper describes a business college's four-year experience in integrating technology in the undergraduate curriculum. In specially designed presentation classrooms that support program goals, technology is used in three ways: students learn to use technology to communicate ideas, instructors use technology to teach principles and concepts, and professors use technology to evaluate learning objectives. Preliminary multiple-measure assessment suggests that this program is meeting its goals: students' communication skills are improving, and they are learning to use technology to prepare and present information effectively.
Jamie Murphy
Theme 1
Florida State University; USA
'Textbook Publishers in a Networked World'
In a flurry of initiatives, textbook publishers are scrambling to profit from the Internet (Murphy, 1998). Harcourt Brace, for example, recently announced "an ambitious plan to establish an institution of high education that only offers courses online" (Mendels, 1999). Although a few trends such as complementary websites and course management software are emerging, the future is far from clear. Peek at the future as a panel of leading textbook publishers share insights about technology's influence and their evolving role in education. Complete courses, interactive testing, synchronous and asynchronous activities, textbook websites, on-line purchasing and multi-media presentations are among the enhanced learning possibilities that publishers are exploring. New York Times on the Web, Wall Street Journal Interactive Edition and Inside Technology Training magazine research provides the basis for my selecting three to five panelists and guiding the group discussion.
Jamie Murphy
Theme 1
Florida State University; USA
'Luddite Learning: A Call For Low-Tech Alternatives'
While today's latest technologies tout synchronous and asynchronous collaborative multi-media learning environments, these same leading-edge technologies suffer from a host of problems such as incompatible platforms, different version and limited bandwidth. And, the more advanced the technology, the less available it becomes to students. Given that students are the customer (Tsichritzis, 1999), universities should consider "easy-edge" technologies for the masses rather than "bleeding-edge" technologies for the few. This paper uses the often-misunderstood Luddite rebellion against technology (Winner, 1997; Folkers, 1997) to support the argument for simple rather than complicated technological distance-learning environments.
Deborah Dunn
Theme 1
Tusculum College; USA
'Teaching Technology in the Focused Calendar'
Tusculum College has engaged in a process of examining and reviewing its programs which has resulted in a significant and far reaching transformation of the curriculum and the campus culture. Under the heading, "Civic Arts", five principal reforms have been inaugurated since the fall of 1991: the Commons, a set of interdisciplinary courses required for all students; the Competency Program, where students demonstrate competency in 9 areas prior to graduation; Self-Governance, in which the college is governed by committees composed of students, faculty, and staff; Civic Arts Project, where students complete and 80-hour service project prior to graduation; and the Focused Calendar, where all courses are taught one at a time for a duration of 18 days. This paper will focus on the pedagogical changes necessary to teach technology under the focused calendar environment. This is timely because many higher education institutions are currently reexamining both curricula and programs.
Valerie A. Taylor
Cynthia C. Rudy
Theme 1
York County School Division; USA
'Using Educational Technology to Increase Student Achievement in a Standards Based Environment'
Technology can be an effective tool used to improve student achievement. As classroom technology is designed to support accountability standards, instructional methods require revision to meet the various learning styles of the students. Technology offers school districts the opportunity to reduce the pupil/teacher ratio, promote active student mastery of the curriculum and change the traditional lecture method to one of student/teacher collaboration. As instructional methods evolve using technology, electronic learning becomes a standard companion of the traditional textbook. This presentation will focus on the processes for technology implementation to support a standards-based curriculum. These systems include the selection process for software and electronic support materials and hardware and network design. In addition, an overview of professional development activities emphasizing daily instructional technology integration strategies will be provided. Student assessment and intervention strategies using technology will also be highlighted.
Maria Helena Araujo e Sa
Theme 1
Universidade de Aveiro; Portugal
'Intercomprehension, Romance Languages and Hypermedia: The European Project GALATEA'
In this session we will present a hypermedia product for the learning of intercomprehension in romance languages. This product is the result of the work of a European team from different countries who intend to educate a plurilingual citizen in order to deal with different languages and cultures. The product explores the learning potential of the speaker contacting with a new language of the same linguistic family. The methodology develops the following principles: (1) to promote the discovery and analysis of the verbal data through specific activities; (2) to put forward a set of hypertext of lexical, grammatical and civilisational help tools in order to lead to the construction of meaning; (3) to explore the total communicative and metacommunicative competence acquired in other situations of contact with different languages. These principles will be exemplified with the CDRom for the learning of French by the speakers of Portuguese as a mother tongue.
Egil Toldnes
Theme 1
; Norway
'Project-Based Learning in Secondary School - From Information Chaos to Multimedia Text Production'
The new Norwegian curriculum (L97) has a strong focus on project based learning and ICT. Many Norwegian teachers have experienced that students when using ICT in this setting very often start their work browsing the web, getting a lot more information than they can handle. We therefore need strategies to avoid that the students go into browsing in an "entertain me" mode. In our session we want to present an action research project at Huseby school in Trondheim (Norway) where the students work project based with subjects from the Science curriculum using Arts & Crafts and ICT for motivation and presentation. The aim for the project is to help students develop better learning processes by making text productions in a multimedia and PBL context. The project focuses on three main questions: 1) When students use ICT in their projects, are they too focused on collecting information? 2) How can we encourage students to act more like producers of knowledge and culture? 3) What happens when students make projects where they create their own multimedia texts?
Rosana Giaretta Sguerra Miskulin
Theme 1
State University of Campinas; Brazil
'Integration of Tridimensional Logo With an Animation Environment in the Process of Construction and Visualization of Spatial Objects'
In this paper, some reflections about the present trends in Mathematics Education in relation to the new technologies are presented, by making explicit the theoretical-methodological presuppositions of the Tridimensional Logo. In addition, some pedagogical and mathematical aspects related to the applicability of Logo Tridimensional in the process of construction and visualization of geometrical concepts are described in an animation context (AVI Constructor and ScreenCam). Under these perspectives, one tries to answer the following investigation problem: is it possible to redeem the didactic-cognitive possibilities of Tridimenstional Logo in the pedagogical exploration of geometrical concepts? In order to achieve that, some theoretical-methodological considerations are presented about the Case Study conducted in the research, which analyses microgenetically the mental and computational processes of one subject attending the 8th grade in a private school in Campinas, SP, Brasil, in problem solving situations, conceived as design activities. This approach provides teachers and researchers in Mathematics Education with a refelction on their teaching practice, and an opportunity for them to adapt it to the new needs that have become imperative with the advance of technology.
Conrad Van Voorst
Theme 1
SUNY College at Brockport; USA
'Technology in Mathematics Teacher Education'
My presentation will focus on key elements of a graduate teacher education course that provides new mathematics teachers with a structured, supportive environment for "discussing" and "modeling" effective ways of integrating technology into the curriculum. The major objective of the course is for teachers to discover strategies for teaching topics from the secondary mathematics curriculum in ways that develop students' understanding of the underlying math concepts. Activities used and developed in the class reflect the goals of the New York State Math, Science, and Technology (MST) Standards. Technology is used as a tool for solving problems, experimenting, and verifying conclusions. Teachers are given the opportunity to develop "research lessons" in the course, present these lessons using the appropriate technology, and get feedback from their colleagues before implementing them in their own classes. Along with presenting an overview and rationale for the course, I will discuss the reactions of teachers as to the effectiveness of the course in changing their thinking about mathematics and the teaching of mathematics using technology.
Renee Jeffery
Theme 1
Garland County Community College; USA
'Partnership in a Hospitality Program: Where Education Meets Industry'
The Hospitality Administration Certificate program at Garland County Community College in Hot Springs, Arkansas, was developed using the DACUM (develop a curriculum) process, allowing industry professionals to tell college officials what skills they wanted taught in the program. By developing the curriculum this way, industry is assured graduates possess appropriate knowledge, skills, values, and experiences. The Hospitality Program: The Certificate of Proficiency in Hospitality Administration is fully accredited with other colleges and universities in the state of Arkansas. Day classes consist of two-hour blocks that are taught on Tuesday and Thursday for a 12-week semester. Also, for the busy professional, GCCC has one-night a week classes for 16 weeks. This allows a student the flexibility of a working adult program. After the core courses are complete, the student participates in an internship program. The makeup of the student body is equally distributed among industry professionals, non-traditional students, and traditional college students. Industry properties have encouraged their management and supervisory employees to obtain the certificate during normal work hours. Some properties have also paid for the tuition, books and fees through corporate sponsorship, payroll deductions, and reimbursements. The Business Division also offers a Hospitality Administration Scholarship. Implementation in the Classroom: The textbooks used in the classes are industry recognized, from the National Restaurant Association and the American Hotel and Motel Association. All hospitality classes are taught in the Computer Resource Center or utilize a laboratory class where students are encouraged and required to conduct research, use CD based workbooks, and use hospitality software. This enables the student to become computer literate, understand how the hospitality industry can utilize cutting edge technology, and enhance the students overall perception of computer software for today's hospitality professional. The focus of GCCC's Hospitality Program encompasses three dimensions. The first is the student's knowledge of the computer. If a student has limited skills, then classes are tailored to meet the needs of the students. Then classes are made available so that the student can perform basic computer tasks. Second, are the hospitality textbooks that use computer software as exercises. These exercises and software help the student integrate the technology with the industry. Third, the industry. Since the program was developed by industry professionals, the "living laboratory" is utilized for internship opportunities, classroom presentations, and field trips. The Future of the Hospitality Administration Program: The instructor is currently involved in a partnership with the Arkansas Department of Workforce Education to develop hospitality and tourism curriculum to be taught in Arkansas high schools. Distance education classes, on-line courses, compressed video courses, and telecourses are in development and will be implemented by the fall 1999. Other plans include an associate degree at GCCC, a hospitality newsletter, and a student chapter of the Arkansas Hospitality Association. We hope that this program will help raise the consciousness of the people of Arkansas about the importance of the hospitality industry and its economic impact on our state, and that technology and quality education will continue to be at the forefront of the State of Arkansas.
Frans Doppen
Theme 1
University of Florida, P.K. Yonge Developmental Research School; USA
'Multiple Perspectives: The Atomic Bomb'
The presenters will provide information about a Social Studies-English based multimedia unit for high school students. The unit focuses on the use of technology in the curriculum to help students become independent self-motivated learners. Through the use of PowerPoint, Hyperstudio, a teacher-created webpage and primary and secondary source documents, students will analyze multiple perspectives on the decision to use the atomic bomb against Japan. The unit provides a structured opportunity for students to create meaning within a multicultural context. Additionally, the learning activities allow students to not only review their content knowledge but also to enhance that knowledge through Internet links that enable them to gain an empathic, personal understanding of these historical events. Teachers will gain new ideas about how they can integrate technology frameworks in their classrooms by facilitating independent learning and assessing student progress.
John Wm. Sanders
Theme 1
Middle Tennessee State University; USA
'Self Pacing Technology Approach: The Preservice Course as a Catalyst For Learning'
As technological applications become widespread in today's classrooms, the preservice technology course acts as the avenue for modeling successful instructional practices that addresses the needs of an academically diverse student population. Through a unique self-pacing approach, preservice students are given opportunities to work at their own pace in designing technology portfolios and in acquiring the skills that will assist them in becoming technologically literate. Suggestions are outlined which illustrate a preservice technology course that allows for individual differences, pacing, and practice in order to facilitate learning as well as technology integration within lesson plans.
Ed Youth
Theme 1
Skills Update of Maryland; USA
'Training Adult Learners to Use the World Wide Web'
Whereas the Adult Learner community once felt little need for Internet access, the availability of e-mail, on-line shopping malls, travel assistance, and general medical information have brought record numbers of Adult Learners to classrooms in search of training. This paper discusses a tried and proven program of training which emphasizes non-intimidation. Class size, course content, class duration, and presentation techniques are all discussed. Critical ingredients such as what to purchase, how to get the equipment set up, how to get on-line, how to use the computer and, how to find help are at the heart of the Adult Learner's information desires. This paper discusses a successful approach to answering all of these questions plus more.
J. Christine Harmes
Theme 1
University of South Florida; USA
'Adding Interactivity to Web-Based Instruction'
Move beyond a website that presents static pages of content for students to scroll through. Learn to create activities that get students more involved in the learning process. Using tools such as Dynamic HTML, JavaScript, and LiveStage you can easily build web pages that present your course material in a more exciting way while also giving students different opportunities to interact with the content. Dynamic HTML allows for the use of layers which can be used for animation or click and drag interaction. JavaScript is an easy-to-learn scripting language which lets you create activities with responses such as pop-up boxes, status bar messages, and validation and feedback based on form data. LiveStage is a software package that creates interactive QuickTime movies in formats such as games, puzzles, or sprite animation. This session will provide an overview of the tools, demonstrations of their uses, and support materials.
Sandra A. Holmes
Theme 1
Messiah College; USA
'Multiple Intelligence Theory and the Internet: Designing Units to Foster Science and Technnological Literacy Through a Student's Learning Style'
Preservice education students created thematic Internet science activity units based on Howard Hardner's eight multiple intelligences. Content topics were selected from those which appear in 80% of published science texts. KWHL charts and content webs organized each thematic unit. Internet sites for children were identified and evaluated with an Internet Evaluation instrument. Activities were designed to enhance science content through Internet sites and multiple intelligences. Units focused at the early childhood (N-2), primary (1-3), intermediate (4-6), or middle school (5-8) level. Activities were aligned to the national mathematics (K-4 and 5-8) standards. Units were piloted by public school teachers in a district which emphasizes multiple intelligences as an instructional strategy. The revised Internet units were compressed into topical chapters. Samples of these exemplary units will be available for preview.
Sandra A. Holmes
Theme 1
Messiah College; USA
'CD-ROM Laboratory Explorations Replace Traditional Labs in an Introductory Biology Course'
Real life CD-ROM simulations required application of practical and critical thinking skills, provided students a means to observe results of changes they imposed, and collect/analyze data in a period of minutes as compared to weeks in a true lab setting. By exploring the effects of variables, students learned key concepts; gained a better understanding of scientific processes through application; were introduced to physiology, genetics, cellular physiology and developmental biology concepts; and furthered their understanding of the evolutionary paradigm that underlies modern biology. Students constructed journals following each CD-ROM based experiment. Follow-up occurred through e-mail questions and assignments. The student journaling and e-mail component provided responsibility and accountability on content topics, helped students develop in-depth topical knowledge, explore their own interests as it related to the topic, developed a means for students to self-evaluate their work/knowledge to a prescribed standard/rubric, and fostered development of an appreciation for the search for knowledge.
Terry R. Armstrong
Theme 1
Armstrong Consulting; USA
'Using the Internet for Teaching in Remote Regions: A Finnish Experience'
Offering a valid educational experience at remote locations having few academic resources has always been a problem, financially and logistically. Yet, previous models and attempts at distance learning came up short in a number of areas. Now, the Internet has opened up new possibilities. The authors were given the task to teach an undergraduate course in Strategic Management in a remote Finnish location without many needed library resources. Their experiences led, serendipitously, to an approach combining a few strategic management models, the Internet, and student presentations to allay fears they had about academic soundness in previous models. The presentation will give details of how the design of the course, which could not have been taught adequately without the Internet, has lead to a fascinating approach for using the Internet in a traditional classroom as well as in remote locations.
John Pisapia
Theme 1
Florida Atlantic University; USA
'The Elementary Computer Initiative: Teacher Benefits'
This three year study describes the effects of placing five computers and an ink jet color printer in each regular elementary classroom in a metropolitan type school district of 55,000 students on teacher behavior. Data were collected through classroom observations, focus group interviews, teacher surveys, software surveys, and standardized test scores. The study concluded that: * Teacher computer ability dramatically improved since beginning of initiative. * Computers were primarily used to improve language arts, reading and writing skills. * Instruction focused on: (1) challenging high ability students and (2) improving student directed learning rather than remediating deficiencies. * Instructional delivery changed by: (1) better able to present more complex material, (2) use a more thematic approach, (3) less lecture and whole class instruction, and (4) more small group instruction. * Teacher work behavior changed by: (1) planning how to integrate computer into subject matter delivery and (2) produce better teacher products.
Valerie C. Bryan
Theme 1
Florida Atlantic University; USA
'Old Technology Themed for the New Millennium'
The growing numbers of aging Baby Boomers has forced many adults into thinking about the aging process in a new way and with a new attitude. A brief overview will share the significance of this topic to both young and older audiences. An old technology, cartooning, will be introduced as a comfortable means for "attitude adjustment" during this change phenomenon. The session will address how humor can be used as a logical tool for this transition and how cartooning can play a specific role. The concept of storyboarding will be expanded as to how this introduction of humor can work in many teaching areas, particularly when addressing subjects that are uncomfortable or sensitive or require some change in views or attitudes. Participants will receive some exercises for writing a script for their own area of interest.
Debra Hargrove
Theme 1
Ahai Learning Resources, Inc.; USA
'Malcolm Knowles Would be Proud of Instructional Technologies'
The correlation between the effective use of instructional technologies and the principles of Malcolm Knowles will be highlighted through an interactive session with some modified role-playing. The information will be based on current ongoing research. An overview of how the domains of learning are addressed through the various instructional technologies and when technology integration is appropriate will be provided to each participant. Participants will receive pertinent information as to what tools work best to distribute information, deliver lectures, help others to organize information, enhance problem solving, stimulate thought processes or discussions, and help to make decisions. Participants will leave with a PowerPoint presentation and other guided materials on a CD-ROM with suggested URL sites for the participants further study.
Andre Bresges
Theme 1
Gerhard-Mercator, university of Duisburg; Germany
'The German "Learning Field" Approach and its Support by Multimedia'
In Germany, education is heading away from pre-structured lessons towards the more constructivistic approach of "learning fields". The goal is to analyze the large complex structures of tasks a subject may be confronted with at his working place or in his private/social environment and then set up a learning environment - the "learning field" - for problem-based learning. Current research in the Gerhard-Mercator-University of Duisburg/ North Rhine-Westphalia covers design, test and evaluation of supporting multimedia tools for this approach, beginning with information databases for self-directed learning and decision support for in-classroom projects, along multimedia supported real-life/hands-on experiments, towards fully virtual learning environments for online and distant, home and working-place learning. Special research interest are diagnostic tools for on-line learning support and the social behavior of learning groups.
Chunxiao Jiang
Theme 1
Sichuan Normal University; China
'Multimedia Computer Assistant Instruction System on Course of Human Anatomy and Physiology Applying to Normal University'
A multimedia teaching software on human anatomy and physiology has been developed which applies mainly to training students in normal university. This software consists of four subsystems: teaching demonstration section, director section, examination section and teaching analysis section. It provides an amount of demonstrating materials about human structure, simulating process about important physiological phenomenon and mechanism, and some demonstrating experiments which practice difficult due to need for special equipment. It also includes simulating teaching - practice pattern. The MCAL system, providing an individual environment with multimedia( text, sound, image, animation and video) and interactive mode for students, enhances learning effect: 1) Average grade increased 4.8 in 100-grading system in the group applying the MACL system; 2) A group (students) applied some parts of the MCAL system to school teaching practice and received high evaluation. In addition, demonstrating materials and simulating experiments make up the shortage of specimen and equipment and the MCAL system's usage sharpens student's ability to apply modern educational method.
Barton D. Thurber
Theme 1
University of San Diego; USA
'The Web in the College Classroom: Strategies, Evaluation, Implementation'
The authors review the uses of computers in the college curriculum, including the implementation of distance education strategies, the advantages and disadvantages of web-based instruction, and the constitution of traditional academic discourse in an electronic environment. We then propose a model for the use of computers in colleges, the web (a) as a bibliographic resource but also (b) as a means of expression. The former, while significant for college-level courses, essentially duplicates the function of a library; the latter, we argue is crucial for in substituting web page design for the conventional term paper--substituting nonlinear hypermedia for standard prose--we give our students the tools to occupy, rather than simply consult, the web, and demonstrate what writing may become in the computer age.
Donald B. Egolf
Theme 1
University of Pittsburgh; USA
'Augmenting the Traditional Course with Internet Ancillaries'
Teachers of traditionally-taught courses have for years used text-bound computer support in their teaching, email and data-base searching, for example. The internet dramatically increased ancillary supports for the traditional course. Multi-media and higher-level interactive capabilities became available and the number of searchable data bases significantly increased. This presentation reports three studies where the internet was used as ancillary support for the traditional course. Study 1 involved a class where students created a website about the course material. Study 2 dealt with students who made in-class presentations using computer-projected, internet-found images. And, Study 3 demonstrated how students can use the internet to create new knowledge. Here nonverbal communication students had visitors to a website make judgments about human faces to test hypotheses about facial attractiveness. These studies show that teachers who prefer to stay with the traditional face-to-face approach can nonetheless exploit the internet to enhance the learning experience.
Sherri Smith
Theme 1
Florida Gulf Coast university; USA
'Synthesizing New Technologies with Traditional Instructional Methods: The Challenge of Distance Education Communication'
This study presents an analysis of Internet-based distance courses from a communications viewpoint. Face-to-face communication is a key element of traditional classroom learning and teaching. Distance education changes the methodology of communication from face-to-face to asynchronous exchange. Alternative communication options are explored to analyze effectiveness and suitability in the distance education environment.
Colleen Swain
Theme 1
University of Florida; USA
'Technology Rich Lessons: What Might They Look Like?'
Most teachers in the K-12 and higher education environment recognize the importance of integrating technology into their lessons but often are at a loss of how to create these "technology rich lessons" they hear about in workshops, conferences, and inservice sessions. Teachers have remarked how overwhelming the task of creating these lessons seems. When working with teachers on the seamless integration of technology into their curricula, the approach I have taken has been to demonstrate technology rich lessons, teach the skills needed for those lessons, and then let the teachers try out the lessons in their classroom. As teachers became more comfortable adapting these lessons for their students, they also began creating more technology rich lessons and desired to learn additional technology skills. This paper will discuss several of the lesson plans used with teachers and some of the responses of teachers from their experience.
Margaret J. Cox
Theme 1
School District No. 2; USA
'Toward the Year 2000: Delphi Study of Beneficial Uses of the Internet in K-6 Education to Increase Student Learning'
The rapidly approaching 21st century brings with it significant developments in the Internet that may revolutionize how students learn and gain access to knowledge. Today, teachers need guidance as to how best they can utilize these developments to improve student learning. This national Delphi study identified and establishes consensus of 93 specific Internet uses and eight major Internet categories beneficial to learning in grades K-6 over the next three years by recognized expert educators who use the Internet to enhance learning. No longer is the teacher confined to the four walls of the classroom nor are adopted materials, textbooks, and library books the sole means of acquiring curricula. Consequently, teachers need encouragement and practical examples of how to use the Internet, and these Internet uses and categories will serve that purpose.
Andrew Kurtz
Theme 1
Bowling Green State University, Firelands College; USA
'Digital Acculturation in the New Communication Technology Curriculum'
Associate Degree programs in new communication technologies have taken an instrumental approach to curricular design. Assessing hiring trends and work-force deficiencies, two-year degree granting colleges seek to fill these gaps through the implementation of programs based upon pragmatic assumptions of skills-training, arguably the mission of such institutions since their inception. In this paper, I will suggest that the cultural component of new communication technologies forces us to rethink this pragmatic approach to curricular design. Specifically, I will argue that in focusing on technical training, Associate Degree programs ignore the fact that individuals engaged in the production of new communication technologies are part of a cultural group for whom digital technology is the basis of social interaction. Becoming part of this group, what I call "digital acculturation", is as important to individual success as learning the technology around which the group is organized.
Mercy N. Fodje
Theme 1
Cameroon GCE Board; Cameroon
'The Impact of Technology to Education in the Developing Countries'
The combination of education and technology has been considered the main key to human progress. Education feeds technology, which in turn forms the basis for education. It is therefore not surprising that to be "developed" is to have had education based on western knowledge, science and technology. This is today considered progress. The rapid emergence of new technologies brings certain worries to mind. If these new technologies at a time of dramatic population increase continue to produce more and more with less and less labor input then we are heading for a world with hundreds of millions of marginalized humans. What the world needs today is not talent in producing new technologies but talent in understanding the impact of technology on the society and individuals. This calls again on education. We have to produce graduates of all disciplines with some depth of understanding of the environment, of the consequences of large-scale inequity, and the difference between technological development and human development. Educational programs in the third world heretofore have been designed around the western ideals. These need to be reworked to reflect the indigenous cultures and promote human values while at the same time producing the talent for "controlled" technological advancement. Only then would we be able to talk of development. This paper attempts to provide highlights on areas of the educational system of Cameroon, which can be improved for development to be a reality, and also proposes how information technology could be of use to education in the third world for the 21st century.
Christine Frank
Theme 1
Georgian College of Applied Arts and Technology; Canada
'The Best of Both Worlds'
On-campus courses that blend face-to-face and online learning make use of two rich learning environments. They also give both students and teachers the chance to gain technical skills in a gradual way. A practical advantage is the freeing of classroom space for part of the class time. Founded in both socio-constructivist and adult learning theory, the learner-centered approach gives greater control and responsibility for learning to the learner and emphasizes the importance of collaboration in the learning process. Research on conferencing for learner-centered education, along with student response to blended classes, will be presented. Descriptions of blended courses and appropriate teaching strategies that encourage critical thinking will also be given. The presenter is currently finishing her doctoral thesis on online teaching and has taught several blended courses at the community college level.
Luis Valadares Tavares
Theme 1
Universidade Catolica Portuguesa; Portugal
'Distance Learning in Management: The Dislogo Case-Study in Portugal'
Since 1994, Universade Catolica Porguguesa, launched a Distance Learning Program in Management, DISLOGO (DIS-Distance + LOGO- Knowledge). Based on innovative technological products, the distance learning is based on textbooks, presential sessions every 15 days on Saturdays, a private e-mail network, a service provider network (ISS - Information Service for Students) and videoconferencing. Nine courses are opened: General Management, Negotiation and Leadership, Marketing, Finance, Insurance Management, Project Management, Human Resources, Business Law and Banking Management. The targets of the program include SME managers, middle managers of several companies and technical engineers looking for skills on the management side. The DISLOGO programme already educated about 1000 managers from more than 450 organisations. The profile of the managers is diverse with 24% managers more than 40 years old and 42% more than 30 years old. The use of CD/ROM's in teaching started in 1996 when the first "Global MBA in Management" was launched in Portugal. The future takes the Internet as a new educational path as well as videoconferencing. This paper describes the evolution of the project and analysis of the students motivations to take the courses and the questions facing the future of the project.
Ward Brian Zimmerman
Theme 1
Enterpriz Consulting; USA
'Using the Internet: Enhancing the Secondary English Curriculum'
The purpose of this report is to discuss an Internet enhanced curriculum designed through collaboration between high school teachers and university professors. Challenged by both new state English competencies and a state mandate to integrate technology into the curriculum, this faculty chose to use the Internet as a resource, to provide new learning methods, and as a venue for student publishing. These challenges along with procedures and implementations will be discussed. Future directions for Internet use within this school will be addressed.
Arthur Shapiro
Theme 1
University of South Florida; USA
'Using Technology to Restructure the Classroom Paradigm'
By creatively utilizing technology, this proposal restructures the centuries-old classroom construct presently constraining education and schooling into a "family"-style unit, meeting a wider range of needs. Technology, largely utilized as an adjunct to education and schooling, becomes the organizing principle, reorganizing classroom structures and processes fundamentally. This construct reorganizes the classroom into a "family" group of 5 students as its basic unit. The family operates in its highly flexible turf as a group, as individuals, or with other individuals or families, depending upon goals and objectives, technology, and facilities. The attached diagram illustrates the flexibility of the turf/family concept, suggests possible technologies, and indicates major impact on educational practices. Because the basic instructional unit becomes the small family, cooperative learning, independent learning, and other models are extensively utilized. The teacher becomes facilitator, designing instruction and schooling to purpose, utilizing human, spatial, technological, time, and materials resources as needed.
Lorraine C. Martinez
Theme 1
Los Alamos High School; USA
'The Magic of a PowerPoint Presentation'
Audience: Students taking Spanish. Behavior: Create a PowerPoint presentation based on your essay "Yo" and present it to the class. Conditions: After receiving your graded 200 word essay, student will have 260 minutes (5 classes that meet for 52 minutes) to create a PowerPoint presentation. Degree: Student should have 10 slides (one title page, 3 slides about your past, 3 slides about your present, and 3 slides about your future) and each slide must have a different color, transition, photograph, sound to match the content, 10-15 words of context in Spanish. Assessment: A holistic writing rubric was used to grade the essay and the context of the presentation. A speaking rubric was used to grade the oral presentation. A PowerPoint rubric was used to grade the slides. Standards: Students will use the language studied to reinforce and expand knowledge of other disciplines. Students will use the language studied for personal enjoyment, enrichment, and employability.
Peter Tamburro
Theme 1
Oneida City School District; USA
'Technology Support School Reform'

Ruurd W E van der Wal
Theme 1
Technikon Witwatersrand; South Africa
'Management Information Systems - Inadequately Trained Credit Management Officials at Transnet: A Case Study'
The Centre for Career Development (CCD) at the Technikon Witwatersrand compiles and conducts industry specific courses. One of these courses is the Advanced Credit Management course. This course is tailor-made for Transnet. Transnet as an institution consists of the railways, airways and ports (harbours) in South Africa. In conducting this course the author came to the realisation that the course participants' knowledge of computer hard and software was minimal. They only know who to contact if something has gone wrong. As these students are clients of CCD and also the author, the course material and presentation should be of high quality. Fortunately for the author a computer fair was held during the week of the course and that enhanced the quality of the course. The author used a case study approach utilising both qualitative and quantitative methods. The students answered a questionnaire and wrote an essay on their perception of the course as a whole. These results will be presented at the conference.
Laura Woods
Theme 1
John M. Sexton Elementary; USA
'Class Web Pages Enhance Academic Achievement'
Students who help create and maintain their class web page, take more pride in their achievements at school. Class web pages showcase student accomplishments, creative works, and efforts of members of their educational environment. A classroom web page displays student writing, academic and artistic ability, organizational skills, and classroom management processes. The student's use of the Internet, serves two purposes. It allows access to real world information for use in their academic projects while providing the means by which students may share information about their classroom. Classroom web pages enhance academic achievement, as well as reading and writing, at all levels. This presentation targets ways to develop and implement classroom web pages that include the entire classroom environment and student creativity. Software demonstrated will be mPower and Claris Home page. Handouts on how to easily create a class web page will be provided.
Mun Fie Tsoi
Theme 1
Nanyang Technological University; Singapore
'Multimedia Design in Chemical Education - A Constructivist Approach'
The learning to establish the connections among the three levels of understanding, namely, macroscopic, microscopic, and symbolic in chemical education is a difficult task for many students. Multimedia is one way to address this problem. As such, this paper provides insights gained into some practical design issues to be considered in developing a multimedia courseware in chemical education at secondary school level. It concentrates on the overall multimedia design that maximizes the potential of technology to enhance subject content and pedagogy as well as specific design tips for guidelines based on practical pedagogical experiences in constructivism, courseware design and storyboard. An important module, namely experimental techniques is selected to illustrate certain salient design issues. Implications for designing multimedia courseware in chemical education, which emerge as a result of the design issues considered will also be discussed in the context of both the writer and multimedia producer.
David Williamson
Theme 1
Haringey Education Services; England
'Implementing Government Policy at a District Level'
Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is a central aspect of the British government's educational policy. The "National Grid for Learning" (NGfL) will connect all elementary and high schools to the Internet by the year 2002. A major training programme will improve teachers' use of ICT in teaching and learning. This ICT initiative is happening in parallel to other major educational changes to improve standards of literacy and numeracy. At a local level, Haringey Council, a small district of inner-city London, with high levels of deprivation, is enthusiastically tackling the NGfL programme by connecting all its elementary and high schools to the Internet and by training 2000 teachers to use ICT in their teaching, management and communication. The paper and presentation will examine the strategies to achieve these objectives in a period of major educational change in all aspects of the school curriculum.
Gustavo Schmidt Moreira
Theme 1
Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, NCE/UFRS; Brasil
'Teaching-Learning Economy in a Secondary School Using a Qualitative Computer Modelling System'
This paper discusses some ideas about the importance of using computer modelling in Economy classes with students aged 15-16 years old in a private technical school in Rio de Janeiro. From a perspective of System Dynamics (1) and using a semi-quantitative (or qualitative) computer modelling system calld WLinkIt (2) the students are engaged in exploratory tasks where they externalize and discuss their ideas about some subjects in Economy such as inflation and interest rates. The work presented here also points to the relevance of working with modelling in economy in secondary schools and that we can make it happen when using appropriate computer tools. References: (1) Forrester, J.W. (1992). Road Map: A Guide to Learning System Dynamics, MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Soan School of Managment. (2) Sampaio, F.F., Ogborn, J. (1996). Linkit: A Modelling Tool without Mathematics. The Thirteenth International Conference on Technology and Education. Proceedings Volume 1, March 17-20, 1996, New Orleans, Louisana.
L.H. Christoph
Theme 1
University of Amsterdam; The Netherlands
'On-Line Teaching: Results of a Training for Distance Tutors'
Nowadays the Internet is being used as a teaching tool more and more. One way in which the Internet is used in this respect is for the Virtual Pilot School, initiative of the Lilenthal project (partly funded by the European Commission under contract MM 1016). The Lilenthal project is a collaboration between various flight schools in Europe. The flight schools co-operate in developing a shared distance learning platform for the acquisition of a Private Pilot Licence (PPL), the first stage of any pilot training, professional or non-professional. Until recently, theoretical pilot training used only conventional forms of education, predominantly classroom teaching. Some efforts have been made to integrate the computer into the curriculum, without much success. One problem was that students lost touch with their instructor. The Lilienthal design of the Distance Learning Platform (DLP) takes this finding into account by providing various means of communication for students and tutors. The flight instructors involved in the Lilenthal Project are all traditional classroom teachers with little or no experience with the Internet or distance teaching. For this reason, extensive thought is given to the question of which new capabilities the flight instructors need to engage in distance tutoring and how these capabilities can be trained in a systematic way. A Tele-Tutor Training (TTT) was set up to teach the requirements and for each requirement a specific training method was used. This training for distance tutors has been thoroughly evaluated using different evaluation measurements. During the presentation results of the evaluation of the TTT will be presented and further recommendations for training distance tutors will be given.

Back