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Theme 11 Abstracts

Presenter / Title / Theme / Institution Abstract
Workman Robert
Theme 11
Southern Connecticut State University; USA
'Middle School Applications for Windows Based Digital Video Capture and Nonlinear Editing'
This paper will discuss full motion digital video capturing and editing on Window's PCs. Examples will be taken from middle school video projects that include a tour of the Louvre for use in a French language class; video essays about the Vietnam War and the civil rights movement; and a middle school activity film. Specific topics that will be discussed are camcorder requirements, video capture hardware, and video editing software.
Gary W. Tubb
Theme 11
Hillsborough High School; USA
'Cultivating High School Female Interest in AP Ctt using browser Java Script'

John F. Beaver
Theme 11
Buffalo State College; USA
'Surfing Less, Learning More: Educational Models for Teaching with the Internet'
This panel session showcases a Worldwide Web site designed to facilitate elementary and secondary school teachers' educational use of the Internet. The well-organized portal site contains many links selected to illustrate efficient instructional models for using the Worldwide Web with students. The site has been successfully used by preservice and inservice educators in several American universities and during consulting visits to train teachers in Europe, Africa, and Latin America. The Worldwide Web site, "Educational Applications of the Internet", has links to many effective Internet lessons. The site includes links to help teachers examine 1) lessons in which the Internet is an add-on, 2) lessons in which the Internet is the instructional focus, and 3) lessons that are Internet based. The Web site also includes links that help teachers adopt WWW teaching approaches including: 1) student to student projects, 2) student to expert projects, 3) student to resources projects, and 4) student to motivating tasks.
Jerry P. Galloway
Theme 11
Indiana University Northwest; USA
'Technology Integraton: Training, Education, Indoctrination'
There is, today, a new focus on an old problem: integrating technology into the classroom. Recent studies show that equipment is generally available, that "tool-mastery" courses for teachers are achieving literacy, but then that teachers still fail to use the computer in their own classes. There has been a call for a new approach in teacher training: to show teachers how to use computers in teaching, how to integrate technology into the classroom. This paper will present data with implications that are contrary to these usual solutions and will suggest a different explanation for the problem and, therefore, a different recommendation. This paper will contrast notions of "training" from "education" and will illustrate the flaws of simply showing teachers how. A more elaborate concept of adoption and indoctrination for teachers will be discussed as a means to successful integration.
Jiang B. Liu
Theme 11
Bradley University; USA
'Teach Internet client/Server Computing Using JAVA Network Protocols'
Client/Server computing over the Internet has gained it's popularity in the last few years. It combines the advantages of the distributed client/server computing and the ubiquitous of the Internet delivery. Multi-tiered enterprise JAVA computing delivered on the Internet allowed organizations to quickly deploy their business applications to meet the increasing demand of on-line services. In this paper we will discuss how to teach this new technology using a three-tier client/server application implementation experiment. The purpose of this experiment is to compare different JAVA Network protocols in creating client/server applications on the Internet. JAVA Internet computing technologies included several networking protocols. In our implementations, we have developed a simple three-tier client/server application using JAVA sockets, JAVA RMI (Remote Method Invocation), and JAVA COBRA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture)/IDL (Interface Definition Language) respectively. The comparisons of these three network protocols concentrated mostly on the program design and Internet delivery issues. The results will definitely benefit the developers to choose the appropriate JAVA network protocol for their business applications.
Victoria Giordano
Theme 11
Barry University; USA
'Transforming Technology Training for Teachers'
Teachers have been called on "to educate our youngsters to prepare them to live and work in a world transformed by new technologies, demographic shifts, and economic globalization" (U.S. Dept. of Education, OERI, 1993), requiring schools to consider their educational aims, new curricula, and different pedagogical practices. While billions of dollars are spent each to equip schools with appropriate technologies, the impact of the technologies is yet unclear (Edwards, 1997). Despite an average of one computer for every nine students, a substantial number of teachers report that they don't use computers regularly for instruction. Further, a majority of teachers report that they don't believe they are adequately prepared to use technology. This paper will present the findings of a study that engaged K-12 classroom teachers in a short course to teach them to successfully infuse Internet technologies into their regular classroom curriculum.
Dane Hughes
Theme 11
College of Education; USA
'Computer Competence and the Pre-Service Teacher: Three Years of Program Revision and Technical Support'
Over the past three years the College of Education at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte has been involved in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of Computer Competencies for pre-service teachers. This project has involved training for students, faculty and staff, as well as adjustments to the curriculum in many for the areas of teacher preparation. This session will provide materials to conference participants that describe the process, products and evaluation used to increase technology skill levels, and to integrate computer technology into the teacher education curriculum. The session will focus on the technical support needed over the past three years to implement this project. This technical support includes hardware and software selection, installation, and maintenance. The technical support also includes training of faculty and staff as well as the scheduling of college-wide technology facilities. Examples of what has been learned including successful as well as unsuccessful techniques will be shared with conference participants.
Susan Rae Regan
Theme 11
John Abbott College; Canada
'High Tech, High Touch: Romance in the Wired Classroom'
The collaborative (exciting, dynamic, noise) atmosphere in many wired classrooms stands in stark contrast to the silent, cold, passive paradigm of the traditional lecture hall. Our goal as technology-friendly teachers is to create an on-line global learning "community". A community is defined as a unified body, a partnership, of people with common interests interacting in fellowship. In bringing together our students to exercise their common interests in partnership and collaboration, and cooperation - the more sensual, less intellectual, passions may penetrate the classroom and leave us as teachers uncertain how to deal with such hitherto alien issues as on-line relationships and on-line crushes resulting in sexual harassment. Several of my students have journeyed overseas to visit on-line friends of the opposite sex and at least one such visit resulted in marriage. While we may not be called upon for a direct response to such events, it is important to situate them within the teaching/learning paradigm, even if only for our own reflective purposes.
John F. Beaver
Theme 11
Buffalo State College; USA
'WebQuests: An Approach that uses the Internet Instructionally, not Recreationally'
This session features the use of WebQuests to help teachers use the Worldwide Web for instructional purposes. The session begins with an introduction and brief overview of WebQuest activities. Sample WebQuests designed for distinct content areas and different grade levels are showcased to provide participants a conceptual understanding of the activities. Next, the presenter examines the difficulties teachers encounter when trying to implement WebQuest activities in their classrooms. Often, students lack the requisite skills and background to benefit fully from these valuable internet activities. As a result, scaffolding activities that prepare teachers (and, later, their students) for successful Worldwide Web learning experiences are highly recommended. The presenter defines and briefly discusses the term scaffolding and its implications for educators. He shares activities used in a series of successful Internet training workshops for teachers that include an off-computer scaffolding activity that "deconstructs" a complex WebQuest into its component parts and then "reconstructs" it layer by layer.
Ann Barron
Theme 11
University of South Florida; USA
'VITAL: A Successful Faculty Support System'
VITAL, the Virtual Instructional Team for the Advancement of Learning, offers a collaborative support system for faculty members who are interested in integrating technology into their on-campus courses or who wish to prepare course materials for distance learning initiatives. Interested faculty can seek assistance from these support systems for added expertise in instructional research, course development, computer programming, multi-media production, graphic arts, video production, and the management and integration of information. VITAL involves cross-campus collaboration among several campus entities in a manner that guides faculty to the training and/or instructional design services they need. This presentation will focus on the lessons learned in establishing, operating, and maintaining VITAL. Demonstrations of faculty projects will also be included.
Sal Majied
Theme 11
Mitchell & Titus, LLP Education Consultants; USA
'Innovative Academic Management Solutions'
There are a range of educational tools that are designed to support both academic management and classroom management. This includes the ability to manage the full range of classroom activities using current client/server based solutions, including effectively managing lesson plans and mapping to appropriate educational standards. Some software tools have been designed to facilitate easy customization and integration into the classroom. In addition, there are emerging models for effective use of technology, which can be designed to ease both up-front implementation costs and the associated learning curve on the part of both teachers and administrators. As with any technology there are issues which have to be addressed in order to make an appropriate choice as well as making the most effective use of such tools. Mitchell & Titus, LLP Education Consultants will discuss the use of academic and curriculum management tools and issues related to the use of such technology.

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