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Theme 4 Abstracts

Presenter / Title / Theme / Institution Abstract
Thomas W. Hutchison
Theme 4
Middle Tennessee State University; USA
'Computer Based Campus Information Services'
Some 1.2 million college students at 170 colleges and universities are already using web-based services for student transactions such as registration for classes, fee payments, and numerous other tasks. Middle Tennessee State University (MTSU) and 19 other Tennessee Board of Regents schools have recently joined the host of colleges offering students transactional services via the Internet. MTSU currently offers telephone services for students to register for classes and receive grades and has recently started offering web-based registration and other services. This paper analyzes student reaction to, and use of the new Internet service and compares its popularity to the commonly used telephone-based service and the kiosk-based systems which have been in place for 4 years. A survey conducted on undergraduate students indicates which of the Internet-based services are widely used at the present time. Students are asked to compare the various information services via the Internet, the telephone and through traditional "bricks-and-mortar" methods.
Brad Barrett
Theme 4
Connect Center, Inc; USA
'Students Design and Build Smart Room'
Educational institutions intent on preparing students to function in the post-graduate world should set an objective to structure facilities and curricula mirroring the realities of this world. Schools today must provide students with the opportunity to become skilled and literate users of the technologies and organizational structure they will find in the workplace of the future. At Cass High School, Cartersville, GA, these challenges were addressed by a unique program. The Technology Honors Class transformed a storeroom into a network-enabled classroom with the help of Connect Center, Inc. and it's suppliers. Students formed teams to address tasks from Project Management, thru CAD planning, floor installation, and data cable termination. The students provided all labor, with Connect Center and its suppliers providing training and supervision. The students are also repairing and refurbishing "retired" computers donated by local firms. This hardware will be used to equip the new enabled classroom.
Suzanne H. Hoffmann
Theme 4
Sanford School; USA
'Re-Engineering a School Network: Implementing Changes that Enhance School-Based Technical Support'
After four years of continuous and fast-paced Information Technology (IT) expansion, our institution realized that future growth and curriculum implementation hinged on re-engineering the school-wide network. Increased Internet and intranet-use by administrative staff, faculty and students from grades JK through 12, along with e-mail activities, on-line library resources, and network storage capabilities taxed the existing system limiting expansion. By re-designing the Sanford network with changes in hardware and software, the prospects for future expansion in an organized manner are bright allowing an increase in security and access to instructional and administrative applications and databases. Throughout the process easy-to-use solutions for in-house staff members were emphasized since no network engineer is on-staff. The initial assessment, final goals, and overview of chosen solutions will be presented in this paper.
David Bainum
Theme 4
Washburn University; USA
'The Thin Client/Server Strategy'
Washburn University is an urban, liberal arts institution with graduate and professional programs. The Academic Computer Center (ACC) provides computing support for the academic and research missions of Washburn with particular attention given to doing so with minimal staffing and in the most cost-effective manner. We will discuss the thin client/server strategy employed by the ACC to accomplish these missions. The need to do a lot with a little is a common requirement in academic computing. Our response to the constraints of minimal funding and staffing, while developing and supporting a computing network with hundreds of nodes, has been to adopt a thin-client/server strategy. Our presentation includes details of the client, the server and the network in the thin client/server strategy. User support issues for the IBM RS/6000 and NT platforms involved in this strategy will also be summarized.
Roger Von Holzen
Theme 4
Northwest Missouri State University; USA
'Establishing a Faculty Technology Center'
In its Mission Enhancement proposal to the state of Missouri in 1997, Northwest Missouri State University outlined its plan for the establishment of a faculty technology center. One focus of this center would be on the testing and development of personal computer applications that enhance student learning. But a major goal behind establishing a faculty technology center would be to provide significant support for faculty members working to create web-based and modularized courses. By the spring of 1998, Northwest was able to found its Center for Information Technology in Education (CITE). The focus of this presentation will be on the process involved in staffing the center, determining hardware and software needs, budgetary considerations, and other issues a college or university interested in establishing such a center may encounter. Key considerations related to faculty and administration relations, training, and the production of technology-based learning materials will also be discussed.
Susan Rae Regan
Theme 4
John Abbott College; Canada
'Teacher or Technician - Who Picks up the Slack?'
With one technician servicing a hundred or more computers, problems occurring in class time may not be solved at all if teachers (and students) do not intervene. Draconian cuts to education budgets have forced teachers to assume technical support responsibilities that they are ill-equipped to execute, not necessarily because they lack the required expertise but by the very nature of their job as educator. When a computer "goes down", well-intentioned interventions on the part of technically-knowledgeable teachers often backfire, resulting in greatly reduced teaching time, frustrated students, and an administration that's unaware of the extent of the problem. This paper explores some of the concerns involved in perceptions of appropriate responses to technical problems and conflicting notions of where the responsibility for repairs, upgrades, and software compatibility difficulties lies - with teacher, student, or technician. While my own experience is at the community college level, this problem is quickly replicating at all levels of education.
Adriana Fantini
Theme 4
Universidad. Nacional de la Patagonia; Argentina
'An Experience of Designing an Educational Hypermedia by Teachers of Elementary Education'
Many teachers are interested in adopting hypermedia as support of classroom activities. But at the same time they are not totally satisfied with the software available in the market. Then they try to design their own hypermedia. Teachers that try to do it using an authoring tool, most of times are not satisfied with the product they obtain, because those tools are not created to design an educational hypermedia. To support this task we have defined a method (MHAS) for designing educational hypermedias, based on conceptual network as a guide to create an argument for the hyperspace structure. This method assists the teacher in the software design and propitiate to obtain interactive and quality products for the educational purposes. Here we present this method by an experience with teachers of elementary education. They had building an educational hypermedia that is being used successfully for the students of a fourth course of elementary school of Patagonia, Argentina.
Sal Majied
Theme 4
Mitchell & Titus, LLP Education Consultants; USA
'School Based Change Management'
The decentralization of education program management to the school level has encouraged administrators to either implement or consider the use of information technology as an effective means of supporting the delivery of quality education. The rapid change in technology, including the migration to more distributed system environments, provides an array of options for both administrators and teachers. A significant part of the implementation process is having a clear understanding of the need for and expected benefits to be derived from use of such technology. Solving the technology portion addresses only a part of the overall problem. Schools must also carefully examine how these new technologies will impact operations and current internal processes. Mitchell & Titus, LLP Education Consultants will address effective strategies for managing change that will assist site-level administrators in implementing technology to support program delivery and to ensure quality.
Elizabeth Newby
Theme 4
Liverpool City Council; England
'Proving the Concept'
Liverpool City Council is installing a massive infrastructure in all its schools providing extensive access to the Internet for all teachers and pupils. This project demanded high level strategic planning and a pathfinder exercise has now been established to prove the concept, ahead of implementation at 236 school sites. The pathfinder school, a Victorian built inner city primary school has received: 72 network outlets; remote site hardware, including multiple 24 port switches; PCs, printers and educational software; whiteboard facilities; access via a 2 megabit fibre leased line to the City Council as Internet Service Provider, remote access from home for the headteacher; access to the TALIS server, linking the school to city-wide library services. This paper will analyse the outcomes of the pathfinder project, particularly: learning gains arising from accessing the Internet; child protection issues; changing teaching styles; network and human resource implications; pupil and teacher attitudes to ICT, the outcome of e-mail links between children in Liverpool, England and New York.

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