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Theme 7 Abstracts

Presenter / Title / Theme / Institution Abstract
Michael Fiore
Theme 7
UCLA Molecular Science Project; USA
'CPR and the Molsci Project: Web-based Writing, Peer Review, Curriculum Development, and Dissemination'
Calibrated Peer Review (CPR) software enables writing and peer review over the Internet. CPR provides a series of tools for exploring concepts, writing about those concepts, and reviewing peer writing based on those concepts. CPR significantly reduces the time instructors now spend reading and evaluating student writing and allows instructors of large classes to use intensive writing for assessment. The Molecular Science Project, with NSF support (DUE 95-55605), has developed CPR and uses it to author, review, and disseminate materials for use in lower-division chemistry courses. Instructors use the integrated CPR authoring tools to create new curricular units, which are then posted for review by other instructors. Using integrated review tools, reviewers provide feedback to the assignment author. After assignments pass the review process they are posted to the Project website where visitors can select the pre-built assignments and activate them for use in their classes.
Stanley E Kroder
Theme 7
University of Dallas; USA
'Implementing an MBA on the Internet'
The University of Dallas (Texas) (UD) began offering graduate credit-bering courses on the Internet in the fall of 1997. Three courses and thirty students were involved in the first semester. By the fall of 1999, when the ICTE next meets, UD will have 13 graduate courses and over 200 students taking courses on the Internet. UD has committed to offer the full MBA by 2000. The first degrees offered in this venue are Electronic Commerce, Information Technology and Telecommunications. This paper will discuss the methods used to develop, teach and administer using university resources - insourcing. UD has chosen to outsource the Web hosting for all aspects of this program. The reasons for selecting this option and the issues and procedures implicit with this course of action will be explored. Initially, UD and Pace University (New York) formed an alliance for the purpose of course development, Internet support and Web services. This alliance demonstrates that the Web support required for the Internet education may be outsourced. Recently, UD selected eCollege.com (Denver, Colorado) as its Web hosting service in the future. The rationale and experience with these two arrangements will be covered. The paper will stress the pragmatic and pedagogical aspects of this significant undertaking.
Dale Reed
Theme 7
Learning Sciences, Northwestern University; USA
'Web Page Annotator'
The increased presence of distance learning and on-line course offerings mean content is delivered using the Internet and viewed using web browsers. Students need to be able to customize Internet-delivered curriculum as well as generate shared curriculum. There are two phases to this project. The first is similar to "Third Voice" (http://www/thirdvoice.com) and the Interactive Paper Project (http://lrsdb.ed.uiuc.edu:591/ipp), and is an approach for annotating on-line curriculum, both for students and teachers, including presentation like a threaded newsgroup. The second phase is unique and consists of free-form customization of the underlying HTML, acting as a "overlay" that filters the original content. A user will select a portion of a page and substitute replacement content, which will automatically appear whenever that page is loaded. This work is sponsored by a NSF PFSMETE fellowship.
Marty Bray
Theme 7
University of North Carolina at Charlotte; USA
'Initiating a Distance Education Program: One College of Education's Planning Process'
This paper describes the planning process that a College of Education faculty used to meet the challenges of delivering coursework using a variety of distance education tools including two-way audio and video, the web, and chat sessions. The planning process began with the faculty exploring the different distance education tools available to them. Next, the faculty looked at the courses that they would deliver to these students and sought to determine what course content was best suited to which instructional delivery method. Based on the rubric that was developed as a result of this planning process the faculty identified the resources that they would need to develop and deliver their online courses.
Sheila K Donis
Theme 7
Vigo County School Corp.; USA
'ATM - Global Professional Development'
This is a project intended for the primary application area: Education, Culture, and Life-long Learning and the secondary application area: Community Networking. The Vigo County School Corporation and its consortium members seek to connect to the Indiana State Backbone network which is the latest advancement in network technology. Implemented by IHETS, the backbone provides video, data, and voice services on one single circuit. Goals: With this asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) backbone, we will have the power, speed and convenience to meet our first goal of improving instruction through increased staff development opportunities. Our second goal of communicating with educators around the world will be accomplished through videocasting by which we will be able to provide live or stored video multi-casting through high quality MPEG video. This allows for broadcast of video programs to unlimited remote sites simultaneously or electronically stored for later transmission. Our third goal of providing a library of 'great teaching' will be accomplished through video caching by which we will be able to store and deliver video content for designated use by individuals or on a distance learning network. Teachers all over the world can access samplings of great teaching from their desktop! Outcomes and Impact: The outcomes include the provision of cost-efficient and quality staff development to K-12 teachers. The video clips will show to teachers improved strategies for motivating students and show programs that positively impact achievement scores on standardized tests. Evaluation: After each live or cached video clip is viewed, an electronic evaluation form will be completed. The data will be reviewed to determine which "clips" are worthwhile and prove to be successful and/or helpful in the viewer's classrooms. Results of the evaluations will be stored on-line. Sites: Two-way video sites will be established to facilitate technology for one staff development center, 12 public schools, 3 private schools, and 1 college. Technologies Employed: We will use asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) - two-way video (broadcasting and caching), digital video photography, computer editing, and midi digital music. Users: The users will participate in live broadcasting of great teachers and great lessons. They will also be able to access the video clips at another time through the Internet. Communities to be Served: K-12 schools, colleges, businesses, libraries, parents, and community members of the Wabash Valley in Southwest Indiana, Inner City Chicago, Indianapolis and the Cherokee Indian Reservation in North Carolina (All school communities around the world will be able to freely access the videos through the Internet.). Participating Partners: Indiana: IHETS, Indiana Dept. of Education, Vigo Co. School Corp, Indiana University, Indiana State University, St. Mary-of-the-Woods College, Marian Hts. Academy, The Greater Terre Haute Chamber of Commerce, Terre Haute Public Library, The Holocause Museum, The Eiteljorg Museum, and the Gary Children's Art Institute. Illinois: Providence-St. Mel High School in Chicago. North Carolina: K-12 schools of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians. New York: High School of Art and Design.
Ian Douglas
Theme 7
Florida State University; USA
'Talking Head Videos: Using a Task-Based Approach to Enrich Perspectives on Knowledge'
Video has long been regarded as a useful tool in education although its creation requires a great deal of skill, talent and money. Educators sometimes shortcut this requirement by using a "talking head" approach. This is criticized as being a poor use of the medium affording little interaction for the student. An approach for using video over the Web is described, which focuses on developing interactive tasks for students viewing videos. Video interviews were conducted at several software companies. A Standard set of questions were asked and responses were recorded onto digital video. The educational value of this tool is derived from the formulation of good interview questions and tasks that require students to view the videos with a specific purpose in mind. Tasks involving analysis and comparison allow students to develop an understanding of the different perspectives on issues relating to the subject and how those perspectives are influenced by different working constraints.
Barbara Eubanks
Theme 7
Bay District Schools; USA
'Beacon Learning Center: On-line Learning for K-8 Students'
The Beacon Learning Center provides interesting, interactive, Web-based lessons tied to Florida's Sunshine State Standards. Students work at their own pace and receive immediate feedback to reinforce the lesson content. Teachers can individualize instruction by prescribing a sequence of lessons for each student, or teachers can assign the same sequence for every student. Teacher-validated units of instruction, including pre- and post-assessments, daily lesson plans, and additional resources, suggest how to maximize the effectiveness of the on-line student lessons. Each unit provides ideas for additional student activities - some of which use technology and others that don't - to build similar concepts. In addition to the Web-based lessons, students may use electronic spreadsheets, word processors, Global Positioning Systems (GPSs), or other Web sites to complete a designated activity. Units can be downloaded in MS Word format for future editing or printing. Use this FREE internet tool with our K-8 students today!
Annette Lorentsen
Theme 7
Aalborg University; Denmark
'Changing Traditional Universities into Universities of the New Millennium'
Changing universities into virtual universities of the new millennium represents a methodological challenge, since universities represent a unique type of organisation with its old academic values and often weak management structures. This paper starts out analyzing the differences between traditional university culture (Rasmussen, Simonsen/Ulriksen), distance education tradition (Holmberg, Keegan, Peters, Moore, etc.) and the ideology of the new virtual university (Collis, Harasim, Laurillard, Mason) to be able to formulate and fully understand the problems and challenges we will meet when changing universities of today into virtual universities. Two challenges will be discussed in more detail, i.e. the new roles for university teachers/researchers in virtual study programmes and the change from traditional transmissive teaching models to collaborative and experiential learning models (Kolb, Lave/Wenger). Examples from Aalborg University, Denmark as how to face these problems and challenges will be described and evaluated. The method chosen here for university change for the new millennium (called IT, Innovation Initiative [Lorentsen/Christensen]) is concrete experimentation (Dirckinck-Holmfeld/Lorentsen) - in projects dealing with different aspects of the virtual university - combined with a gradual more profound change of the university into a learning organisation of the 20 century (Schon, Sengue).
Brogan Pat
Theme 7
Macromedia; USA
'Creating Interactive Teaching and Learning Solutions'
Many educators and trainers are looking to better use technology to deliver high quality instruction. This session will focus on the opportunities that the web creates to provide more personalized instruction, which can better meet a more diverse population of learners' needs. The session will include a demonstration of instructional authoring tools created specifically for non-programmer instructors, integrated with a management system, which provides an integrated teaching and learning system. The benefits of using an integrated mediated learning approach will be discussed, along with guidelines on how to successfully implement a program. Successful educational institutional and corporate success stories will be highlighted.
Cavanaugh Catherine
Theme 7
Florida Center for Instructional Technology, College of Education; USA
'Effectiveness of Interactive Distance Learning for K-12 Academic Learning'
This paper summarizes a synthesis of studies of the effectiveness of interactive distance education using videoconferencing and telecommunications for K-12 academic achievement. Effect sizes for 19 experimental and quasi-experimental studies including 929 student participants were analyzed across sample characteristics, study methods, learning environment, learner attributes, and technological characteristics. The overall mean effect size was 0.147, a small positive effect in favor of distance education. Effect sizes were more positive for distance education programs that combine an individualized approach with traditional classroom instruction. Programs including instruction delivered via telecommunications, enhancement of classroom learning, short duration, and small groups yielded larger effect sizes than programs using videoconferencing, primary instruction via distance, long duration, and large groups. This synthesis supports the use of interactive distance education to complement, enhance and expand education options because distance education can be expected to result in achievement at least comparable to traditional instruction in most academic circumstances.
Philip Crompton
Theme 7
University of Stirling; United Kingdom
'ODL Pedagogy, Organisation and Technology: A Review'
The paper is a review of the educational approaches used in telematics-based Distance Learning (ODL). Particular reference is made to projects supported by the Telematics Applications Programme (TAP) of the Fourth framework of the EC Research and Technological Development programme. The paper concentrates on practice, reflecting how practitioners of ODL are using information technology (C&IT) to deliver and support the learning process. The first part of the paper presents a summary of current theory relating to ODL, with particular reference to the constructivist model of learning. The next part describes the findings of a questionnaire distributed to practitioners of telematics-based ODL and presents a number of examples of current ODL projects. The final section deals with the gap between theory and practice in telematics-based ODL and the new convergence of communication and information technologies and their ability to provide a supportive environment for the development of learning communities.
Francesc Vallverdu
Theme 7
Universitat Oberta de Catalunya; Spain
'An Interactive E-Book Applied to Mathematical Learning'
This work will discuss on a course material in web-format for teaching and learning Discrete Mathematics, a subject that is offered at the Computer Science School of the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC). UOC is an Open University with a virtual campus where both students and teachers interact, breaking time and distance constraints. For UOC students the classical textbook is no longer useful so we propose a digital and navigable didactic material that integrates the basic elements of the self-learning process. Also, it contains self-evaluation exercises, computer animation, audio, conceptual maps and glossaries. Obviously, the material will include any kind of typical navigator functionality, too. The learning and teaching process is evolving with the new information technologies. The teacher-student relationship is changing, even more in distance education. The interactivity between the student and the material can be done through the resolution of exercises and the experimentation with simulated cases. The simple exercises are usually Java Applets embedded in the same html page where the exercise evolves, in an xml framework. Depending on the student's behavior and skills, different paths are presented in order to optimize the learning process. The more the student knows, the more difficult the questions are. A tailor-made and oriented evolution implies an intelligent tracking of the student's actions. In this respect, we might say that this kind of activity allows either the student to learn significantly or the teacher to keep the process under control.
Maritta Belcher
Theme 7
Pike County Board of Education; USA
'Rural Outreach Project'
The Pike County School System in Kentucky uses an innovative method of distance learning to overcome some of the barriers that come with being located in a rural mountainous area. This school system has initiated a combined effort of subject area experts, enhanced curriculum, dedicated staff, and state of the art video conferencing equipment to travel on a "Virtual Field Trip" to a large urban zoo, science museum, public library, university, or performing arts center. All K-12 students are given the opportunity to participate in the lessons provided by the subject area experts at each of these sites. Highly skilled high school teachers are also providing students in other high schools in this school system instruction in foreign language, math, and science. We believe this is the new dynamics of learning!
Phillip J. Heeler
Theme 7
Northwest Missouri State University; USA
'Graduate Computer Education: Past, Present, Future'
At Northwest Missouri State University, graduate computer education has existed since 1980 with the establishment of a Master of Science degree in School Computer Studies. This degree was designed specifically for teachers who were either currently teaching high school computer classes or were planning to implement high school computer classes in their schools. Since that first degree program, and based upon graduate student expectations and preparations, two significant revisions in curriculum and delivery methods have brought the program through the 1990's. As we prepare for the 21st century, the interest in distance learning, Internet availability, curriculum topics, and modified student expectations are each having an impact on the next revision of this degree program. This presentation will focus on the current issues of graduate level computer education using a twenty-year history to analyze the problems and to help prepare for the next generation of computer education students.
Sheree Aston
Theme 7
Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine; USA
'An On-line Continuing Medical Education Program'
The Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine launched a web-based program to offer continuing medical education courses to Doctors of Podiatric Medicine. A subdivision of the school's Institutional Technology Committee developed the template for the new programming delivered via TopClass software. The on-line program is approved by the Council of Podiatric Medical Education. The course elements include: Asynchronized delivery, learning objectives, images and text, assessment questions, evaluation form and e-mail with instructor. The advantages of the on-line courses are accessibility, convenience, self-paced instruction, flexibility, variety of topics, interactivity with faculty, high quality programming, inexpensive for practitioners and it leaves more time for patient care and family. The author will discuss the process for development of the on-line program and will demonstrate the courses.
Fred Spooner
Theme 7
University of North Carolina at Charlotte; USA
'Lesson Learned from Five Years of Distance Delivery: Two Media May be Better than One'
Distance delivery appears to be living up to its billing as an effective way to reach students who may not be reached based on distance from a major university campus, geographic constraints, or due to the number of programs which may be officially offered in a state university system due to the nature of the content. Two-way interactive television as a distance delivery medium has been available within the University of North Carolina University System for over 15 years. On the other hand, using the Internet for individual access instruction has only been used as a effective tool for most instructors for about the last two years. We will report on the experiences and successes we have had over the last five years in using two-way interactive television coupled with the Internet as effectively delivery mechanisms. For example, using two media to deliver course content should be more effective than just using one media (e.g., two-way interactive television).
Gina Roberts
Theme 7
University of Tennessee, Knoxville; USA
'Supporting Faculty Use of Online Course Management Systems'
An increasing number of higher education institutions are adopting course management system (CMS) software to support the development and delivery of online courses and course components. CMS packages offer a multitude of options for sharing course resources, testing online, communicating and collaborating, and managing student information. Faculty users of CMS packages are required not only to acquire new technical skills, but also to re-think the delivery of course content in this environment. In order to make this endeavor more beneficial for our faculty and students, the Innovative Technologies Collaborative (ITC) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, offers a program of support and training that includes instructor-led courses, web-based resources, e-mail and phone assistance, a users listserv, and focus group meetings. During this session ITC personnel will share the details of this support effort along with lessons learned thus far. Time will be allotted for group discussions on similar issues faced by other institutions.
Zheng Song
Theme 7
Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; Singapore
'Java Applet in Distance Learning'
With the advent of Java applet technology in the recent years, it is very convenient to develop and deliver interactive teaching courseware on the World Wide Web. Java is designed to be "Write Once and Run Anywhere" owing to its platform-independence. In this paper, we introduce a new Java applet that can facilitate students in analyzing frequency response of analog circuits. It forms part of our research in methods to distance learning. By entering the web page through a web browser, students can edit/enter a schematic and sweep the components' values. The applet can then display the frequency response, show the matrix equations and illustrate the computation steps. Due to the security consideration, browser does not allow applets to save/read data to/from the local hard disk. We suggest a client/server socket communication to solve this problem. We also compare Java to other computer languages and discuss their advantages and shortcomings in Internet programming.
Kevin Smith
Theme 7
University of Nebraska; USA
'Courses with CLASS: Web-Based High School Courses'
This session is a report on the work done at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a Star Schools grant-funded project called CLASS (Communication, Learning, and Assessment in a Student-centered System). The CLASS project is creating an accredited high school sequence for delivery on the World Wide Web. The courses we are creating are asynchronous web-based courses that students can take from their home, school, or learning center depending on their need. All of the courses are highly interactive with rich graphic environments that enhance the learning. At the present time there are 20 courses available for enrollment. To give you an idea of what the CLASS project has to offer and what kinds of things we are doing in our courses, we will give a demonstration of some of the courses and talk about the challenges of creating courses for this environment.
Fred Croop
Theme 7
College Misericordia; USA
'Unifying the Enabling Technologies of Web-based Course Presentation'
While most web-based course presentation software gives the instructor discrete enabling technologies such as bulletin boards, chat rooms, white boards, web-based information centers, student presentation areas and video and audio communications, the technology fails, cognitively and pedagogically, to afford the instructor a clear means to link them together. Managing these links to unify a course needs to concern the instructor just as much as the presentation of the course content. If done efficiently and effectively, the unification of the enabling technologies offers a means to establish and enhance relationships among students who do not interact face to face and provide an intuitive, synergistic learning environment. This poster presentation provides a model for managing the enabling technologies of web-based instruction so that the course, as seen by the students, emerges as a seamless, unfied learning experience.
Jerald D. Cole
Theme 7
New York Institute of Technology; USA
'Incorporating Streaming Video Into Instructional Webs'
This article illustrates how to incorporate streaming videos into instructional Webs. Streaming video is a relatively high quality/low bandwidth format suitable for asynchronous Web-based broadcast. The production system utilizes a digital video camera and digital capture card for pre-production, and Adobe Premiere and RealVideo Producer for post-production in streaming video format. Streaming video increases the sense of presence in distance learning via instructional Webs. Live links to streaming video presentations serve as exemplars.
Ali Jafari
Theme 7
Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis, IUPUI; USA
'The Oncourse Project at Indiana University: Design, Development, and Implementation of an Enterprise Course Management System'
This presentation reports on the research and development of the Oncourse Project designed and implemented at all the campuses of Indiana University. Oncourse, through interfacing with the university legacy systems, dynamically creates a website for every course section offered at the University. Each course website features communication and collaboration tools including message board, e-mail, chat, announcement, grade book, class roster, library tools, and more as needed for teaching and learning. In addition to the dynamic creation of the websites, the Oncourse automatically creates a "profile" or a dynamic home page for every student, faculty and staff accessible through the use of university NT domain. Oncourse was totally designed and developed at the WebLab (now being called CyberLab) at Indiana University, IUPUI campus. This paper elaborates on both the conceptual and technical design of a contemporary teaching and learning enterprise system. In addition to the Oncourse, this paper report on the development of A New Global Environment for Learning, or ANGEL, being designed and developed at the IUPUI Cyberlab. The ANGEL includes new tools such as Intelligent Agents, Distributed Authentication, and Enterprise Information System. This presentation will benefit both technology administrators and faculty members who are interested in the selection and use of web-based teaching and learning course management environment. More information about the Oncourse is available at http://cyberlab.iupui..edu and http://Oncourse.iu.edu/

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