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Theme 8 Abstracts

Presenter / Title / Theme / Institution Abstract
Judy Barrett Litoff
Theme 8
Bryant College; USA
'Using Technology to Foster Collaborative Learning at a Distance: The National Academy of Sciences of Belarus and Bryant College Connection'

(See Special Sessions)
This session draws upon a five-year collaborative venture between Bryant College, Smithfield, RI, and the Information Technologies Center (ITC) of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus in Minsk. Six scholars from Bryant and the ITC will collaboratively write a paper that describes the methodology and practices of the Collaborative Learning at a Distance Project between the two institutions. The paper will highlight the technological and cultural challenges encountered in providing collaborative learning opportunities to students at Bryant and in Belarus. The session will include a demonstration of the types of technology appropriate for collaborative learning across international boundaries with significantly different technological environments and requirements. Panelists will showcase the web-based courses they have developed and demonstrate how inexpensive technologies, such as internet video capture programs and virtual roundtable discussions via e-mail, promote collaborative learning across international boundaries. Panelists will also draw on lessons they learned while conducting a 1999 HESP summer School on Collaborative Distance Learning in Minsk.
Leon T. Hobbs, Sam Nichols, Stephanie B. Ash, Scott Lisenby

-- Special Presentation --
Dothan City Schools; USA

'Technology in Technicolor with a Southern Accent'
Dothan, Alabama is an urban area with a population of approximately 65,000. It sits in the southeast corner of Alabama, 80 miles for the Florida Gulf Coast and 30 miles from Georgia. Although Dothan has major industries such as Michelin and Sony, the region is a predominately agricultural area. School enrollment as of January 1, 1999 was 9,058 students. The district has 19 schools: 11 elementary (five grades K-2, five grades 3-5 and one grades K-5), 4 middle schools (two grades 6-8 and one grades 6-7, and one grade 8), 2 high schools (grades 9-12), one technology center, and one alternative learning center. All schools have fully function LANS. Each school is connected to the central office and the transportation department with a WAN. This is a frame relay utilizing 128k and frame T1's. Every office, classroom, lab and media center have Internet access provided through the Alabama SuperComputer Authority in Huntsville, AL. This is a state grant that Dothan City has received. The following is an overview of the structure of the Dothan City Schools' presentation using the theme of a kaleidoscope. A multimedia presentation containing pictures and videos will enhance the speakers. As speakers and topics change the presentation will change as if turning a kaleidoscope to reveal changes in colors. Dr. Hobbs will open the presentation with an overviw of the Dothan area and school district demographics. As the kaleidoscope turns, Dr. Nichols will move the participants from a time in which Apple IIe computers dominated the classrooms and curriculum to a system connecting modern Pentium computers in offices, media centers labs and classrooms by a wide area network. Again the kaleidoscope turns to show students in the elementary and secondary schools utilizing technology in the learning process. The Director of Elementary Curriculum and the Director of Secondary Curriculum will provide curriculum integration techniques at the district level. The kaleidoscope will stop to focus on elementaray areas where teachers use Internet, e-mail and curriculum specific software in daily learning activities. It again turns to focus on middle schools with students and teachers in classrooms and labs. At the high school, the kaleidoscope stops to bring into focus one of the six 1998 Milken Award winners from Alabama.
Miika Marttanen
Theme 8
University of Jyvaskyla; Finland
'Learning Environments for Studying Argumentation - Learning Effects of E-mail and Face-to-Face Study'
In a teaching experiment 16 face-to-face and ?? e-mail Finnish university students engaged in an argumentation course. The 19 students of the control group did not study argumentation. The course involved two lectures, exercises with argumentative texts, and face-to-face or e-mail seminar discussions based on these texts, free debate, role play, problem solving and panel discussion were the devices used in organizing the course. The level of the students' argumentation skills were measured before and after the course. The results indicated that the e-mail studies sharpened the students' skills in identifying the relevant grounds from an argumentative text and choosing the correct grounds from different alternatives, while the face-to-face students improved in putting forward counterargumentation. The control group did not improve in these skills. They study suggests that argumentation skills can be promoted by short term e-mail and face-to-face teaching, and that practising argumentation in different learning environments develops different kinds of argumentation skills.
Philip Crompton
Theme 8
University of Stirling; United Kingdom
'Collaborative vs. Co-operative Learning in a Web-Based Environment'
This paper seeks to examine the results of research from an ODL course delivered by the Internet based on a collaborative learning environment. The course was totally web-based and the students were located in four different European countries who did not physically meet but were set a series of collaborative activities as part of the course. The work sought to identify patterns of social interaction and attempts to register social presence within the learning environment. We analysed the online conversations of learners, focusing on a classification of their interactions (Underwood, J. and G., 1999) in an attempt to distinguish key characteristics of co-operative and collaborative working. The work sought to identify those elements of discussion, which are associated with performance enhancement. The final part of the work attempts to examine these results against a Vygotskyian background of facilitated learning through peer interaction and how the social constructivist nature of the learning environment assisted in the learning process. The conclusion raises issues of whether we can evaluate learning through the analysis of a series of collaborative artefacts between learner and learner and learner and tutor or must we take greater account of the contexts underpinning these activities.
Brad Barrett
Theme 8
Connect Center, Inc; USA
'Creating Flexible Networked Classrooms'
Educational institutions must prepare students to function in the post-graduate world. Business process and organization is shifting from individual tasks and structured hierarchies to collaborative teaming and employee empowerment. Schools today must provide students with the opportunity to become skilled and literate users of the technologies and organizational structures they will find in the workplace of the future. Today's business trends are making "the fixed office" an endangered species. Integrating technology into the classroom has frequently resulted in students being tethered to the classroom walls by power plugs and network connections, losing the flexibility of traditional, re-arrangeable classrooms. A new system, developed by Connect Center, Inc., provides a concealed, embedded grid of power and data access points throughout the room. Ubiquitous, flexible connectivity restores the configurability of the classroom, enabling ad hoc teaming and collaboration much like what the students will find in the new workplace.
Ann-Charlotte Markman
Theme 8
Rosjoskolan; Sweden
'Design a Creative Interactive Learning Environment'
Our pupils are 7 to 12 years old. They are all used to working with PCs as a word processor and for practising spelling, math, etc. They use programs like MS/Word, PP and Publisher. They know how to scan a picture and they have their own e-mail addresses. We want to progress. Our challenge is to make it possible to develop interactive learning environments to support new ways of learning, to encourage and enhance discovery, creativity, thinking and expression. We now work with a Lego-Dacta program to challenge the children to build their own models and to control the model by computer. We work together with schools in England and Denmark for the children to: 1) work in groups, choose a method and solve a problem; 2) create a construction; 3) describe the solution in English; 4) evaluate the solution; 5) compare the solutions. In this project we will encourage new ways of thinking and learning in new domains.
Richard Pollard
Theme 8
University of Idaho; USA
'Using Technology for Teacher Internships in the Next Millennium'
The national mandate to improve teacher training has provided the impetus for those charged with teacher preparation to explore the use of technology as a means of facilitating program renewal. In states featuring the majority of schools geographically-dispersed from the universities, technology would seem a most appropriate tool for creating a new teacher internship program. This presentation will examine a new approach to teacher training being piloted by the University of Idaho. It features a discussion of the use of technology to facilitate this innovative program wherein preservice students serve a year long internship in schools hundreds of miles away from the university. These preservice teachers will be able to take content-area and methods classes via interactive video and the internet. Collaboration will be fostered through the use of a web board featuring mentor K-12 teachers and university faculty. This presentation will address the crucial role technology plays in enhancing the teacher preparation program and the specifics of how technology is being used to strengthen teacher internships. It will provide a blueprint for instituting successful teacher internships in the next millennium.
Montse Guitert Catasus
Theme 8
Open University of Catalunya; Spain
'Asynchronous Collaborative Learning: the Case of the UOC'
This work describes a pilot experience carried out by four professors from the Multimedia and Computer Science departments, four tutors and experts of instructional design and 250 students working collaboratively in the Virtual Campus of the Open University of Catalunya (UOC). Following an action research methodology, this experience aims to: better understand the organization and management difficulties encountered in asynchronous collaborative work, describe the traits of a course curriculum based on collaborative activities, specify the required initial conditions which enhance collaborative work, and develop a framework of collaborative learning in a Virtual Environment. The experience carried out so far, based on analysis of data gathered through student interviews, questionnaires, exchanged documents, journals and discussions, sheds light on the following aspects that promote effective asynchronous collaborative work in virtual environments: characteristics of effective learning teams, desired functionalities of the tools used, the tutor role, the students' attitudes, the nature of the collaborative learning activities, the learning skills, the different organization structures adopted for exchanging information, and the strategies and principles used for the individual and group work assessment.
Constance Pollard
Theme 8
Boise State University; USA
'Creating a Technology-Rich Teaching Paradigm'
In order for colleges of education to succeed in using technology as a teaching and learning medium, the technology must be an intrinsic part of the vision of the teacher education program. Teaching in a technology-rich learning environment enables college instructors to model the use of technology and preservice teachers to develop a comfort level with the technology and feel confident about using it in their future classrooms. This presentation examines the role of teacher education preservice programs in providing technology expertise that extends beyond the mere training of computer applications to a focus on the use of technology to facilitate learning through a technology-rich teaching paradigm. Not only do the instructors of education courses need to model instructional technology, their students need hands-on activities that require them to actually use technology in planning, managing and delivering instruction. This presentation provides a model for implementing technology-based activities designed to enrich the curriculum and enhance learning. Preservice teachers need training, support and direction to be able to successfully incorporate technology in instruction.
Sandra A. Holmes
Theme 8
Messiah College; USA
'Student Authors and Editors Build Multi-Grade Partnerships'
A fifth grade teacher initiated a cross grade editing project with a first grade teacher. Fifth grade students needed relevance for grammar and spelling kills and first grade students needed more process writing time. Thus, a partnership was born. First grade students brought their invented spelling stories to the computer lab. if lab time was not sufficient, the students collaborated one-on-one using the classroom computer. Fifth grade editors checked for spelling errors, grammatical errors, and encouraged expansion of ideas. The cycle has gone full circle - the students in the initial first grade class are currently the fifth grade editors. Writing projects included "The Big Snow," dental hygiene, and other topics. A video of fifth grade students sharing the challenges of being an editor, samples of first grade author books, attitudinal surveys, and how to set up a similar program in your school will be shared.
Mary Ann Zager
Theme 8
Florida Gulf Coast University; USA
'Teaching Research Methods via the Internet: Accepting the Challenge and Making it Work'
Research methods and statistics courses have long held a unique position in social science curricula: one or both courses are part of the required curricula, and they are often the courses least clearly related to the students' major. Many of our students, however, see these as difficult required courses that don't have much to do with their chosen field of study. They have heard horror stories about how difficult (boring, etc.) the course is, and if there is any focus on statistics, students are likely to think of this as a "math" class. All of these challenges to effective teaching are exacerbated when teaching through distance. This paper presents one strategy of conveying difficult materials--using a combination of technological resources including web pages, message boards, e-mail, texts, software, and supplemental documents. The current strategy was developed from several semesters of on campus and distance delivery of a required research methods course in an undergraduate criminal justice program.
Marty Beech
Theme 8
Florida State University; USA
'Electronic Support for Special Education Teachers'
An electronic support system for teachers has been developed by the Center for Performance Technology at Florida State University to support the implementation of a standards-based curriculum for students with disabilities in Florida. The first component of the system is a relational database of the standards, course descriptions, and state-adopted instructional resources available on a CD-ROM. A management system is included to help teachers individualize their instruction planning and record the progress of secondary students with disabilities. The second component is a web-based collaborative community for teachers to implement "Florida's Life Prep Curriculum for Special Diploma". Using the website, teachers can find and submit ideas for well-designed units and lessons to use with students with disabilities in grades 6-12. The website is being developed with and for teachers in school districts throughout Florida.
Sara Olin Zimmerman
Theme 8
Appalachian State University; USA
'Thoughts on Technology Training: Creating Collaborative Learning Environments'
This study was designed to determine the effects of collaborative learning environments for teachers within schools to learn about technology and create new paradigms for education. Participants in this study were middle school teachers, school administrators, and professors. This model used telecommunications and multi-media as primary tools for formulating and communicating with others. Participation in social practices while learning technological skills was encouraged. Procedures for implementation of this model and results from its evaluation will be presented along with implications for the development of programs and future studies.
Idalia Sa-Chaves
Theme 8
University of Aveiro; Portugal
'Multilevel Teacher Education, Supervision Systems & Collaborative Learning; Analysing Interaction Through Photographic Hypertext Representations'
Professional and personal education of teachers evolves within organisational models that represent greatly complex systems. These entail both the interface of conceptions, beliefs and cultures of their interlocutors, and the complex web that organises and ascribes meaning to the institutions, differentiating, epistlemologically, the dimensions of Teachers' Professional Knowledge. We aim to describe an approach to the multiple forms of collaborative learning, developed with/between schools (Alarcao & Sa-Chaves, 1994). This approach, based on Bronfenbrenner's model of human development (1979) stimulated the emergence of collaborative and reflective learning environments, constituting themselves into one of the main success factors at different levels of teacher education. Taking the life story of this system (last ten years), approaches and interactions will be photographically documented. These have been systematically developed (Sa-Chaves & Alarcao, 1998, 1999; Moreira, 1996; Alarcao & Moreira, 1993) along research paths of Visual Literacy Development, Professional Knowledge of Teachers (Shulman, 1986, 1987) and Cognitive Flexibility Theory (Spiro etal, 1987; Jacobson, 1994).
Leon T. Hobbs
Theme 8
Dothan City Schools; USA
'Technology in Technicolor with a Southern Accent'
Dothan, Alabama is an urban area with a population of approximately 65,000. It sits in the southeast corner of Alabama, 80 miles for the Florida Gulf Coast and 30 miles from Georgia. Although Dothan has major industries such as Michelin and Sony, the region is a predominately agricultural area. School enrollment as of January 1, 1999 was 9,058 students. The district has 19 schools: 11 elementary (five grades K-2, five grades 3-5 and one grades K-5), 4 middle schools (two grades 6-8 and one grades 6-7, and one grade 8), 2 high schools (grades 9-12), one technology center, and one alternative learning center. All schools have fully function LANS. Each school is connected to the central office and the transportation department with a WAN. This is a frame relay utilizing 128k and frame T1's. Every office, classroom, lab and media center have Internet access provided through the Alabama SuperComputer Authority in Huntsville, AL. This is a state grant that Dothan City has received. The following is an overview of the structure of the Dothan City Schools' presentation using the theme of a kaleidoscope. A multimedia presentation containing pictures and videos will enhance the speakers. As speakers and topics change the presentation will change as if turning a kaleidoscope to reveal changes in colors. Dr. Hobbs will open the presentation with an overview of the Dothan area and school district demographics. As the kaleidoscope turns, Dr. Nichols will move the participants from a time in which Apple IIe computers dominated the classrooms and curriculum to a system connecting modern Pentium computers in offices, media centers labs and classrooms by a wide area network. Again the kaleidoscope turns to show students in the elementary and secondary schools utilizing technology in the learning process. The Director of Elementary Curriculum and the Director of Secondary Curriculum will provide curriculum integration techniques at the district level. The kaleidoscope will stop to focus on elementary areas where teachers use Internet, e-mail and curriculum specific software in daily learning activities. It again turns to focus on middle schools with students and teachers in classrooms and labs. At the high school, the kaleidoscope stops to bring into focus one of the six 1998 Milken Award winners from Alabama. Wanda Emblom will discuss "best practices" for the integration of technology in the high school area. Before leaving the infusion into curriculum, the focus turns to the Dothan Technology Center that received a grant from Cisco to become a Cisco Regional Training Center for students and teachers from other school districts. The kaleidoscope program will turn to a technical hue as the Director of Technology discusses the teacher-training program developed for both Dothan City Schools and the surrounding school districts. The presentation will conclude with the support of technology covering both technology services at the district level and the support team in each school. The final turn of the kaleidoscope will intertwine parts of the total presentation to show the composite picture of technology enhancing student learning. This final turn will also reveal plans for future expansion.
Marisol Gonzalez Lozano
Theme 8
Instituto Tecnologico Autonomo de Mexico; Mexico
'Universities Towards the 21st Century: The Integration of Technology-Based Educational Models'
Based on various researches, we acknowledge there are no special models for distance education or computer-based education that can indeed satisfy the needs of both professors and students. It seems as we go deeper into the world of technology, the establishment of pedagogical models is left on a secondary position next to the endless technical possibilities. Tools are being built, systems programmed, Web sites created, but no communication among the student, the professor and the environment is being established. In this sense, a strategy designed to promote active participation and to create an apprentice community becomes necessary. Considering the above, the question is not "Which is the most suitable or better technology?" but "What is the most adequate way of integrating it?" It has become necessary to develop a media combination, which is appropriate to the student's and instructor's characteristics, the teaching targets, the environment, strategies and the availability of resources. Analyzing the aspects technology must contain to efficiently support education, and considering some of the main needs of students within the new educational model, we are aware that no technology on its own will be able to satisfy completely every aspect of the educational process. Nevertheless, by integrating different technologies and education models designed for each particular subject, the weaknesses of one of them should be fortified by another's strengths. The necessary technological outline for establishing a comprehensive education model must be based on the Internet, tutorial systems and/or multimedia tools, and books and/or printed media. Internet provides the communication structure between teacher and student. It allows access to sources and information for each subject, and it enables communication through chats and discussion groups among the participants. Tutorial systems allow students to have an interactive tool, with shorter response-time than the Internet, through animations, hypertext, and simulators. Finally books and printed media, specifically designed for the use of Tutorial systems, provide the student with additional aid in the use of both tools, while at the same time, provide the written traditional support. This paper seeks to introduce ITAM's current proposal to connect the different needs and profiles of students and professors, with the primary objective of implementing computer-based education, which empowers the abilities of the different participants in the learning process, while at the same time, integrates technologies and traditional education models.
Roger Von Holzen
Theme 8
Northwest Missouri State University; USA
'Shifting the Online Course Paradigm'
In the rush to offer web-based courses, most colleges and universities have "thrown" curriculum materials out on the web and then announced to the world that they are offering web-based courses. In reality, though, most of these materials are glorified syllabi containing course outlines, reading assignments, and links to relevant web sites. Instead of being a paradigm shift, this is simply a reshuffling of the old correspondence courses. At Northwest Missouri State University's Center for Information Technology in Education (CITE), a concerted effort is being made to move web-based courses to the next level where a true change in the paradigm becomes evident. This presentation will focus on the attributes such as courses needed in order to produce such a change, such as short, descriptive online tutorials, open exams, portfolio assessment system, and student interaction. Examples of web-based curriculum produced under the auspices of CITE will be demonstrated.
Stan Silverman
Theme 8
New York Institute of Technology; USA
'School Room to Home Room'
It is clear that students who are in rich technology environments are experiencing vastly enhanced learning experiences. While efforts have been mounted to provide funds to provide some degree equity in classrooms, it is by no means near enough to meet the needs. The treadmill of hardware and software upgrades further complicate this issue. While some schools are able to acquire the technology from grant programs they are unable to keep them at the "state of the art" so the learning advantage of the technology quickly diminishes in communities unable to sustain the platform. The advances in thin client technology allow us to look at the issue in a different way. By creating online educational portals and developing low cost thin client and network computing devices the students and teachers will be able to seamlessly move between school, library, after school program and home carrying with them all the educational software, tool software, multimedia and files.
Mildred Lovato
Theme 8
Albuquerque TVI Community College; USA
'R2/D2: Relationship Based Retention/Dimensional Development'
Establishing meaningful relationships drives every aspect of the TECH Center, the nucleus for quality learning at Albuquerque TVI's Technologies Department. Programs include Electronics Technology, Manufacturing Technology, Computing Technology, Computer Animation, Architectural Engineer Drafting Technology, Design Drafting Engineering Technology, Web Technology, and Construction Management. The Achievement Coach for the department, in addition to overseeing the center, is available to provide initial needs assessment and counseling, direction, advice, and referrals for other services geared toward addressing the individual need(s) of the student. The staff includes a group of peer mentors, Technologies work-study students that are required to maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0. They are encouraged to initiate, develop, and complete individual projects that will enhance their learning experience while simultaneously contributing to the quality of services provided through the TECH Center. Also available are technical labs, course schedule information, direction, and support. A WORKFORCE MENTOR PROJECT geared toward first year Technologies students and professionals is also part of the comprehensive and collaborative approach. By providing a realistic view of the work environment, the mentor is able to impart valuable insight to the student, which will enable a smoother transition into the workforce. This paper outlines the creation of a multidimensional relationship based retention model that emphasizes the process of positive development by addressing several dynamics of human interaction.
Paul Wangemann
Theme 8
Motorola University; USA
'How Youth and Adult Mentors Experience Problem based Learning in an Internet-based Shared Environment'
This paper describes experiences of youth and their adult mentors with authentic problem solving in an Internet-based Shared Environment. This initiative is known as Expeditions and the on-line system as iExpeditions. Key questions examined center on the extent and the means in which youth are able to engage in an Expedition. Taking into account the social context and support systems, parents' attitudes toward the iExpeditions project and youth's motivation for these on-line activites are examined. The design for the activities and collaboration of youth is described and contrasted to what actually occurred. In particular, the results of an active group of fourteen youth were analyzed as to why they were more engaged than others less active youth were. We describe four cases from this group to further explore this question. Our discussion summarizes youths' status as collaborators, various factors that affected youths' engagement, and suggestions as to what could be done to ensure effective on-line collaboration.
Mark Geary
Theme 8
Seminole County Public Schools; USA
'The Jeopardy Template'
The use of the computer in the classroom is frequently limited to the capabilities of a word-processor. Even when the computers have Internet access, their use is still frequently limited to basic search procedures that can often be replicated (sometimes with better results) on a media center computer catalogue. This presentation shows how one can use the interactive hyperlinking features of PowerPoint 97 to create dynamic collaborative environments with teacher modifiable versions of a jeopardy type PowerPoint template. This presentation will demonstrate how the template can be modified to be used in a classroom setting, using as an example a template made for an Eighth grade Health class. In addition, the presentation will offer suggestions for a distance/distributed version of this template for intra-county collaborative assignments. A disk with a pre-made template will be distributed to the participants.
Troy Isaak
Theme 8
Millersville University; USA
'harmony Elementary School: A Context For Collaborative Projects'
In an elementary education program, technology is used to develop and facilitate collaborative projects that include pre-service teachers, local and international K-5 students, in-service teachers and university faculty. A virtual elementary school web site that models an elementary school setting provides the connections among the participants in this project. This presentation examines the utilization of the virtual elementary school in the development and implementation of collaborative projects such as 1) developing content specific technology activities and projects for use in the elementary classroom, 2) linking pre-service teachers and K-5 students through e-mail to facilitate reading comprehension skills in younger students, 3) engaging in database activities that examine topics such as life in current and preceding generations, and 4) using e-mail to link local and international students for the purpose of developing language skills.
David K. Foster
Theme 8
Messiah College; USA
'DNA Fingerprinting: A CD-ROM Simulation Allowing Students to be the Judge'
Real life CD-ROM simulations were used to: 1) expand students' perception "of ways of knowing"; 2) provide collaborative communication interactions; 3) foster reflective journaling, critical thinking, and higher order questions; 4) include alternate assessments such as open-ended critiques, e-mail questions, and reflective lab essays; 5) observe results of changes students imposed; and 6) collect/analyze data in a period of minutes as compared to weeks in a factual lab setting. By exploring the effects of variables, students learned key concepts and gained a better understanding of scientific processes through application. Students self selected teams for each lab challenge. Teams were presented with physical evidence (DNA samples from a victim, perpetrator and suspect) from randomly selected courtroom trials and a variety of DNA probes (RFLPs) to use as tools in the analysis. Based upon probe, results, frequency matches were employed to estimate the probability of the match, and determine innocence or guilt.
Scott P. Schaffer
Theme 8
Florida State University; USA
'Development of a Distributed Learning Environment: The Plan, Design and Development'
The content of the paper is based on a development plan currently in design for the U.S. Navy in conjunction with a renown learning institute at a major state university. Leading research references (literature review) and case study ("best practice") references as supporting evidence for the results-oriented distributed learning environment will be presented. The paper describes a conceptual model for a distributed learning environment, including linkages of performance requirements and appropriate learning theories and models. This conceptual model is embedded in a system approach and reflects a learner-centered educational system. The emphasis will on a results-oriented performance model for optimal required outcomes. The model will be described in terms of a performance framework identified by both a needs assessment and needs analysis and comprised of four major subsystems, and the components of each subsystem, including key features and characteristics, functional requirements, and theoretical references.
Isabel Cabrita
Theme 8
University of Aveiro; Portugal
'Collaborative Exploration of a Hypermedia Prototype'
Recently developed research (Cabrita, 1998) allowed us to assess the potencial advantages of a hypermedia prototype (Alves de Oliveira e Cabrita, 1997 e Cabrita, 1999a), designed and developed according to recent orientations for the teaching of Maths, in the acquisition of a complex model--direct proportionality (Cabrita e Alves de Oliveira, 1999b). Given that the curricular programs of Maths pursue objectives which are not exclusively within the area of knowledge, it was also our intent to infer the potencial of exploration of such prototype, collaboratively, in the development of values/attitudes and skills/aptitudes, a problem we intend to address in this paper.

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