Back

Theme 9 Abstracts

Presenter / Title / Theme / Institution Abstract
Andrew J. Brovey
Theme 9
Valdosta State University; USA
'Insure Class Participation with CMC'
During the Fall 1998 semester, I led an instructional technology graduate class known as ITED 7050 - Distance Education, taught via GSAMS (a sophisticated two-way videoconferencing system), e-mail, website and online discussion area. Newly developed during our university's conversion to the semester system, this course introduces students to selected distance learning technologies and their use in instructional delivery systems. Though the course employed a number of methodologies, I'll focus on just one here: insuring class participation through computer-mediated communication (CMC), specifically, an online discussion area and e-mail. Class participation can be defined as interaction centered on content. This interaction takes essentially three forms: (1) a single student actively considering course materials and activities, (2) two or more students interacting with each other about content, (3) a student or students interacting with the instructor about content. Student narratives from this online community confirm CMC as an efficient, effective and affective approach to learning.
Robert M. Colley
Theme 9
Syracuse University Continuing Education; USA
'The Story So Far: Successes and Failures in the Creation of Online'
The presentation will give a brief overview of the relatively recent internet course initiative at Syracuse University, now in its third year. A relatively conservative institution, Syracuse has managed to develop an interesting variety of online credit courses not often found at other universities, in area such as low, creative writing, speech communications, architectural history, bioethics, human sexuality, entrepreneurship, textile design, foodservice management, engineering, children's book illustration, the sociology of evil, Canadian studies, and critical thinking. While the program is gaining momentum, a great deal of administrative effort has been devoted to overcoming significant barriers to the success of the initiative, including such things as the lack of institutional support, faculty inexperience and skepticism, software failures, and student frustration with registration, technical procedures and lack of structure. Discussion will include Syracuse's particular attempts to manage the tension between the ensuring of academic quality and the institutional pressure for new enrollment, and its approach to the complexities of marketing to students beyond the local region. Evaluation data and faculty impression of the comparative performance of online student will be provided.
Pamela A. Seay
Theme 9
Florida Gulf Coast University; USA
'Engaging the Distant Learner: Interactivity Over the Internet'
Learning at a distance can present a wide range of challenges, especially when the learner has been accustomed to traditional teaching methods. Through the use of interactive assignments, a student can become a more focused internet-based learner. This paper discusses the challenges of distance education and some techniques designed to engage the distant learner. Using the experience of a variety of internet course presentations, it explores several successes (and some failures) in assignments and activities used to gain the focus and attention of the distant learner. The paper highlights examples of effective use of internet technology to illustrate alternative means of involving the student in the learning process.
John A. Gretes
Theme 9
College of Education; USA
'Integrating Technology into the 5th Grade Core Curriculum: Does it Make a Difference?'
This paper reports the development, implementation and findings of a study conducted using more than 350 5th grade students to determine if the integration of technology into the core curriculum made a difference in student performance. The study addressed the validity and reliability of the technology assessment keyed to state technology competencies. Students were pre and post tested on the technology competencies to determine student gains. The technology test scores of students involved in the treatment were compared to the scores of students not involved in the treatment. Student end of grade test scores in reading and mathematics were compared over the one year treatment period. The paper also reports teacher and student qualitative data regarding their reactions to the project. Final results of the project will be provided to conference participants.
Jerald D. Cole
Theme 9
New York Institute of Technology; USA
'A Rubric for Evaluating the Quality of Televised Distance Learning Presentations'
This article describes a rubric in use at the New York Institute of Technology for evaluating the quality of televised distance learning presentations. The rubric consists of 6 major criteria and 18 minor criteria. The major criteria cover objectives of presentation, quality of video, vis-a-vis, and computer generated graphics, poise of the presenter and production assistant, and conformity to time constraints. Included are hyperlinks to streaming videos portraying exemplars.
Valerie C. Bryan
Theme 9
Florida Atlantic University; USA
'Low-Cost Technology through WEBTV for High Success for Low-Level Learners'
Participants will view a web-based, competency-based program which uses low-cost WEBTV units to assist clients identified as deficient in areas of language/grammar, reading, or math skills, to access resources on the WWW for career enhancement, self-esteem, and lifelong-learning for themselves and their family. Materials developed for low-level readers will be showcased for adults, seniors, and children in family literacy programs and workforce readiness programs. The web-site that was developed to expand the services available to this special audience will also be ??????????? can't read rest of paper.
William Mangold
Theme 9
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; USA
'An Evaluation of a Freshman Block Registration and Mentoring Program'
In this paper we present an evaluation of a freshman block registration and mentoring program at the University of Arkansas. In an effort to improve retention, the University of Arkansas initiated a freshman block registration and mentoring program in the fall of 1994. In the paper we present an assessment of the effect of the program on retention and academic performance for successive cohorts from 1994 through 1998. We describe the nature of the program and discuss evaluative problems that result from our inability to use an experimental design. Academic performance and retention rates are used as outcome measures and are related to student and university characteristics. We present our evidence of a strong interaction between student ability and program success. Our analysis is based on event history models (follow back life tables and Cox Regression Models).
Valerie C. Bryan
Theme 9
Florida Atlantic University; USA
'Accountability in the Virtual Classroom via Webet for Teacher Training'
Major changes in funding and legislation are currently measuring success of staff development by changes in teacher instructional behavior and the needs and outcomes of their students. More instruction is therefore results-oriented. Online training through a virtual classroom and Webet tool assists in addressing many of these issues. Session will demonstrate Webet: 1) Provides the needed instrumentation to document learner interests and applicability; 2) Allows equal access to training for all learners in service area; 3) Provides 2 1-hour accessibility to accommodate schedules; 4) Provides a centralized and consistent messages about an idea or an issue; 5) Offers the flexibility to select the training components the learner wishes to read and at the learners own pace; 6) Gives easy access to information through the use of "hot-links" to other web sites; 7) Can house listservs to get policies and regulations updates; 8) Offers the capability to network with other agencies through bulletin boards; 9) Assist developers in creating a course in fewer man-hours.
Elizabeth L. Pearman
Theme 9
University of Northern Colorado; USA
'How do we Know? Using a Computerized Assessment to Measure Student Growth in Reading'
This session presents a computerized, individually administered preprimer to grade 6 reading assessment that takes approximately 5 to 10 minutes per student. The assessment can be administered a number of times during the school year without repeating a reading sample and results are available immediately. Results are archived and can be compared with previous results to determine growth. The analysis of student reading includes sight words, beginning, medial, and ending sounds, fluency, comprehension, retelling, and phonic analysis of student reading. Growth can be measured for individual students or groups and can be aggregated by teacher and grade level. Results can be used to plan individual group, or class instruction and shared with parents. The assessment is based on reading research and provides teachers and schools with objective data and information on their reading programs. The assessment program has been tested by teachers, is user friendly and requires minimal teacher training.
Marisol Gonzalez Lozano
Theme 9
Instituto Tecnologico Autonomo de Mexico; Mexido
'The Pros and Cons of the Development of Tutorial Systems on CD and WWW'
This paper analyzes the results on the developing of the Tutorial Systems under two different technologies: CD and WWW. Through the results, timings, and related costs of the implementation of various systems on these technologies, this research summarizes the experiences and opinions of different institutions regarding their advantages and disadvantages for education purposes. The analysis covers a range going from the revision of cognitive models and learning motivation to economical and technical issues. The goal is to establish guidelines for the optimal use of either technology, and the way in which education institutions can develop interactive tutorial systems using both CD's - with an orientation towards multimedia incorporation - and WWW - for the communication and updating of materials. Along the process, it is necessary to try to create a hybrid technology that will make the most out of the above-mentioned technologies, while minimizing the cons with the help of the other one.

Back